Justice Dept Lawsuit Says Facebook Favored immigrants Over US Workers

The Trump administration on Thursday sued Facebook, accusing it of discriminating against American workers by favoring immigrant applicants for thousands of high-paying jobs.

The Department of Justice’s lawsuit opens a new front in the administration’s push against tech companies — and in its clampdown on immigration — as President Donald Trump enters his final weeks in office.

The suit concerns more than 2,600 positions with an average salary of some $156,000, offered from January 2018 to September 2019.

“Facebook engaged in intentional and widespread violations of the law, by setting aside positions for temporary visa holders instead of considering interested and qualified US workers,” assistant attorney general Eric Dreiband, of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, said in a statement outlining the department’s allegations.

The internet giant reserved positions for candidates with H1-B “skilled worker” visas or other temporary work visas, the department said.

Facebook “channeled” jobs to visa holders

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Facebook sued for ‘denying jobs to US workers’



Mark Zuckerberg looking at the camera: Facebook has disputed the allegations made by the Department of Justice


© Getty Images
Facebook has disputed the allegations made by the Department of Justice

The US Department of Justice has accused Facebook of discriminating against American workers by giving hiring preferences to immigrants.

A lawsuit alleges the social media firm refused to recruit, consider or hire qualified and available Americans for more than 2,600 positions.

Those jobs instead went to foreigners on temporary visas, the lawsuit says.

Facebook disputed the allegations, but said it was co-operating with the department.

The lawsuit concerns Facebook’s use of temporary H-1B visas, which are often used by tech companies to bring highly skilled foreign workers to the US.

In its lawsuit, filed on Thursday, the department alleged that Facebook “intentionally created a hiring system” that favoured H-1B visa holders and other temporary workers over Americans.

The department said it filed the lawsuit after a two-year investigation into Facebook’s hiring practices.

The lawsuit seeks “back

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Trump DOJ Sues Facebook For Allegedly Reserving Jobs For Foreign Workers Instead Of Americans

Topline

The Justice Department on Thursday accused Facebook of illegally setting aside jobs for temporary visa holders instead of American workers, another move in the Trump administration’s crackdown on legal immigration.

Key Facts

The lawsuit accuses Facebook of refusing to recruit or consider “qualified and available” U.S. workers for over 2,600 positions that were instead “reserved for temporary visa holders it sponsored for permanent work authorization.”

The complaint alleges that from January 2018 to September 2019, Facebook “sought to channel jobs to temporary visa holders at the expense of U.S. workers by failing to advertise those vacancies on its careers website, requiring applicants to apply by physical mail only, and refusing to consider any U.S.

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Labor agency alleges Google illegally fired two workers who tried to organize

The company fired four employees last year in the wake of protests, but the NLRB only took up two of their cases. One of the said workers, Kathryn Spiers, added a pop-up notification to an internal version of Chrome that reminded her colleagues about their right to organize. At the time, Google said it “dismissed an employee who abused privileged access to modify an internal security tool.”

The other former Google employee named in the complaint, Laurence Berland, was fired after viewing his co-workers’ calendars. Google said it let Berland go over data security violations. Berland was involved in organizing against Google’s partnership with an anti-union consulting firm. If Google decides not to settle the complaint, the case will go before an administrative judge.

Google has faced other accusations of retaliating against employees who have organized protests and reported workplace issues. Workers have demonstrated over the company’s handling of sexual

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The US labor board accused Google of illegally spying on employee activists, firing them, and blocking workers from organizing



a person holding a sign: Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider


© Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider
Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider

  • The National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday filed a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor laws during a crackdown of worker activism last year.
  • The complaint said Google unlawfully terminated two employees involved in worker activism.
  • It also accused Google of violating US labor laws by monitoring and interrogating workers involved in the protests.
  • Five employees were fired late last year for their involvement in protests at the company. Two of those employees are mentioned in the complaint.
  • Are you a current or former Google insider? You can contact this reporter securely using the encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-628-228-1836) or encrypted email ([email protected]). Reach out using a nonwork device.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The National Labor Relations Board (NRLB) on Wednesday issued a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor laws during a crackdown on worker activism last year.

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Two former Google employees say the US labor board will charge the company with unlawfully spying on, then firing, workers involved in protests



a person holding a sign: Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider


© Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider
Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider

  • The National Labor Relations Board will file a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor laws during a crackdown of worker activism last year, according to two of the employees who were terminated.
  • The complaint will state that Google unlawfully terminated two employees involved in worker activism.
  • It will also state that Google violated US labor laws by monitoring and interrogating workers involved in the protests.
  • Five employees were fired late last year for their involvement in protests at the company. Two of those employees are mentioned in the complaint.
  • Are you a current or former Google insider? You can contact this reporter securely using the encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-628-228-1836) or encrypted email ([email protected]). Reach out using a nonwork device.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The National Labor Relations Board will issue a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor

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Amazon workers stage Black Friday protests in 15 countries

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Amazon has hired hundreds of thousands of new workers to handle the spike in consumer demand. 


Declan McCullagh/CNET
For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

A day after Amazon said it will give a holiday bonus to its front-line employees — those most at risk of contracting the coronavirus —  warehouse workers in multiple countries staged strikes and protests on Black Friday.

Full-time employees in the US from Dec. 1 to 31 are eligible for the $300 bonus, Dave Clark, Amazon’s senior vice president of retail operations, said Thursday in a company blog post. Part-time workers in the US employed during the same period will receive a $150 bonus, he said.

“Our teams are doing amazing work serving customers’

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Amazon will give front-line workers an extra $500 million in bonuses by the end of the year



Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images


© Provided by Business Insider
Ina Fassbender/AFP via Getty Images

  • Amazon said it will give out $500 million in bonuses.
  • In December, full-time employees will get $300 bonuses and part-time employees will get $150 bonuses.
  • Other retailers like Walmart and Home Deport have made similar moves.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Amazon will pay out $500 million in holiday bonuses to front-line workers, the company said in a blog post Thursday.

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The money will be payed out in $300 bonuses for full-time employees, and $150 bonuses for part-time employees. Including this money, Amazon says it has paid more than $2.5 billion in bonuses to front-line workers this year. It paid another $500 million in bonuses in June.

The coronavirus had led to a surge in e-commerce spending, and Amazon has reported huge earnings this year. The online retailers warehouses around the country remained open, potentially putting

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Disney plans to lay off roughly 32,000 workers in the first half of 2021



a person wearing a costume: Guests wear required face masks due to the Covid-19 pandemic on Main Street, U.S.A. in front of Cinderella Castle at Walt Disney World Resort's Magic Kingdom on Wednesday, August 12, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Charles Sykes/Invision/AP


© Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Guests wear required face masks due to the Covid-19 pandemic on Main Street, U.S.A. in front of Cinderella Castle at Walt Disney World Resort’s Magic Kingdom on Wednesday, August 12, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

  • The Walt Disney Company said Wednesday it plans to terminate the employment of some 32,000 people in the first half of 2021, Variety reported.
  • “Due to the current climate, including COVID-19 impacts, and changing environment in which we are operating, the company has generated efficiencies in its staffing, including limiting hiring to critical business roles, furloughs, and reductions-in-force,” the company said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Disney is laying off some 32,000 people who work for the company in the first half of 2020.

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In a filing this week with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, The Walt Disney Company said it would be terminating

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SEC proposal could turn gig workers into stockholders

Internet platforms relying on gig workers are getting flak not just for low pay, but also for not providing health insurance and vacation or sick time. The ability to compensate workers in stocks could be a way for them to offer bigger compensation without actually having to fork out cash. It could also be a way to get gig workers invested in a company’s performance, even if said company doesn’t offer them the usual employee benefits.

In the SEC’s announcement, the agency wrote:

“The proposed rules reflect the significant evolution that has taken place in the composition and participation of the workforce since the Commission last substantively amended Rule 701 or Form S-8, particularly the development of the so-called “gig economy,” which has resulted in new work relationships.”

Its proposal is now open to public comment over the next 60 days. Take note that two SEC commissioners are opposing the

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