Washington state ranks No. 2 nationwide for annual video game industry economic output at $11.6B

(Halo Infinite Photo)

Washington state’s video games industry overtook Texas last year and claimed the No. 2 spot for total economic output, as the U.S. video game industry grew to new heights yet again.

Those are two takeaways from a new report published by the Entertainment Software Association (ESA), the games industry’s trade organization in the U.S.

In Washington state, the local games industry represents 48,808 jobs, with an economic output of $11.6 billion. This puts it ahead of all other states besides California, which has an effectively insurmountable lead. A little over half of all game development nationwide is done in California, which accounts for $51 billion of the more than $90 billion in economic output generated nationwide in 2019.

The ESA defines “economic output” as “the total value of the goods and services produced in the economy.”

Washington has been an important overall part of the U.S.

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Utah vs. Washington odds, line: Proven computer model reveals picks for Saturday’s Pac-12 showdown

A Pac-12 battle is on tap between the Utah Utes and the Washington Huskies at 7:30 p.m. ET on Saturday at Alaska Airlines Field at Husky Stadium. The Huskies are favored by seven-points in the latest Utah vs. Washington odds from William Hill Sportsbook, and the Over-Under is set at 48.5 (To get the latest college football lines for this week’s games, head over to our college football odds page).

Before you make any Washington vs. Utah picks, you’ll want to see the college football predictions from the SportsLine Projection Model. 

The SportsLine Projection Model simulates every FBS college football game 10,000 times. Over the past four-plus years, the proprietary computer model has generated a stunning profit of over $3,600 for $100 players on its top-rated college football picks against the spread. It is also a sizzling 44-23 on all top-rated picks through 12 weeks of the 2020 college football

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Utah vs. Washington odds, line: 2020 college football picks, Week 13 predictions from proven computer model

The Utah Utes and the Washington Huskies will square off in a Pac-12 clash at 7:30 p.m. ET on Saturday at Alaska Airlines Field at Husky Stadium. Washington is 2-0 overall and 2-0 at home, while the Utes are 0-1 overall and making their first road appearance of the season. Utah is 4-1 in its last five games played in November, while Washington 18-2 in its last 20 home games. 

The Huskies are favored by seven-points in the latest Utah vs. Washington odds from William Hill Sportsbook, and the over-under is set at 48.5. Before entering any Washington vs. Utah picks, you’ll want to see the college football predictions from the advanced computer model at SportsLine.

The SportsLine Projection Model simulates every FBS college football game 10,000 times. Over the past four-plus years, the proprietary computer model has generated a stunning profit of over $3,600 for $100 players on its

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Washington vs. Cowboys line, selections: Advanced computer NFL model releases picks for Thanksgiving Day game

Teams vying for first place in the NFC East meet when the Washington Football Team takes on the Dallas Cowboys on Thursday. Kickoff is slated for 4:30 p.m. ET from AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Dallas is favored by three points at William Hill Sportsbook, while the Over-Under is set at 46 (see up-to-date selections for every game this week on our NFL odds page). Before making any Washington Football Team vs. Cowboys picks, you NEED to check out the NFL predictions from the SportsLine Projection Model.

The model, which simulates every NFL game 10,000 times, is up more than $7,800 for $100 players on top-rated NFL picks since its inception five-plus years ago. It is a sizzling 19-10 on top-rated NFL picks this season, returning almost $800. The model also enters Week 12 on an incredible 115-75 run on top-rated NFL picks that dates back to the 2017 season.

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Line and the Taiwanese Government Are Beating Disinformation. Can Washington Learn From Them?

For many Americans who work in tech, Taiwan has become a model for the fight against disinformation. Like the United States, Taiwan is sharply divided on major issues, including national identity, China policy, and the legalization of same-sex marriage. Urban-rural divisions have further split Taiwanese society, and two major parties, whose relations have grown increasingly acrimonious, dominate Taiwanese politics. Yet unlike the United States, Taiwan is getting disinformation under control.

Partly, that success is due to government crackdowns on groups that spread disinformation, Taipei’s initiatives to improve media literacy, and President Tsai Ing-wen’s decision to prioritize the problem, exemplified by her appointment of Audrey Tang, a software engineer, as digital minister in 2016. But the crux of Taipei’s approach lies elsewhere: namely, in its ability to harness the power of its civil society and tech industry through a robust public-private partnership initiative.

In looking to Taiwan, the United States and

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Who’s ahead on 5G? – The Washington Post

Early analysis suggests the incoming Biden administration may continue to see Huawei’s growing dominance as a security threat. While offering U.S.-backed loans to compete with Huawei marks a significant change in how Washington aims to push against Huawei’s success, there’s more to the company’s global reach than Chinese state-backed export loans. Beijing’s domestic support and influence in international organizations also help Huawei gain a competitive advantage.

How might this U.S. move affect the global telecom equipment market? Here are three things to know.

1. Loans are key to Huawei’s global presence

The Center for American Progress (CAP), a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, recently published a report that analyzes the industrial policy tools Beijing uses to support Huawei.

A key part of Huawei’s global success has been what Beijing refers to as “iron triangle” loans. Here’s how this works: Chinese state policy banks provide loans to mobile network operators across the

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Capital Projects: New Architecture Rethinking Design in Washington D.C.

Capital Projects: New Architecture Rethinking Design in Washington D.C.

Washington D.C. has earned a reputation for iconic architecture. Emerging from the L’Enfant and McMillan Plans, Washington’s cityscape includes wide streets and low-rise buildings that sprawl out from circles and rectangular plazas. From the White House to Lincoln Memorial, Washington’s architecture was built to symbolize the nation’s values. Today, new projects are designed to rethink the city’s morphology while respecting its identity.

© Edmund SumnerCourtesy of Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission© Eric Taylor© Richard Barnes+ 11

© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

Informed by a series of standards, the city and the National Mall were planned in accordance with the Height Act of 1910 that controlled density and height limits. Building off powerful works like Maya Lin’s Vietnam Memorial, new projects showcase a range of contemporary approaches to design across Washington. Built among historic contexts, these projects reinterpret monumentality through modern forms and expressions.

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Beyond the platform, Lockheed looks at networking and moving data — Washington Technology

Nick Wakeman

Beyond the platform, Lockheed looks at networking and moving data

When Lockheed Martin sold its IS&GS services business to Leidos four years ago, the defense giant sent a clear signal that its future was focused on the big weapons platforms such the F-35 fighter, Patriot missiles and Sikorsky helicopters.

But the company’s new CEO James Taiclet is expanding that vision to include 5G, artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies that aren’t about bending metal. His vision is to bring defense, telecom and commercial technology together.

No, the company isn’t getting back into IT services, at least not the traditional systems integration type. But moving data and increasing computing power are central to what Taiclet says is the future for the company and for the warfighter in the 21st century.

“We want to be a bridge” to bring commercial technologies into the defense enterprise, Taiclet said Thursday during a an investor

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Washington State Could Be the 2021 Battleground for Internet Privacy

A senior lawmaker in Washington believes the state can be the next hub for consumer privacy legislation in the U.S., following California’s lead. But he faces continued opposition from within his own party over how it should be enforced.

State Sen. Reuven Carlyle, a Democrat who chairs the Washington state Senate’s Environment, Energy & Technology Committee, said he is evaluating the recently approved California Privacy Rights Act with an eye toward updating the Washington Privacy Act in the coming weeks in preparation for the next legislative session beginning in January.

Two previous attempts to pass a privacy law failed in the state legislature after drawing criticism from state House Democrats, the state attorney general and advocacy groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington. Mr. Carlyle, however, believes California’s successful ballot measure adds pressure for Washington to follow its lead in 2021, while the defeat last week of

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