Despite development slowdown, the state’s life science industry keeps on building

From the industry’s traditional hub in Cambridge’s Kendall Square to emerging hot spots in Fort Point and the Fenway to vast campuses in more distant locations such as the former Fort Devens, life science companies are launching a wide array of projects, fueled by investors attracted to a fast-growing industry.

“There’s just tremendous interest in investing in these sort of projects,” said John Bonnano, chief investment officer at IQHQ, a real estate firm that’s launching two major life science developments here, and earlier this month closed on a $1.7 billion fund to finance more in Boston, San Francisco, and San Diego. “There’s an awful lot of capital out there right now.”

It’s chasing a market that has only become stronger relative to other real estate sectors. Traditional office tenants now occupy about 3 million fewer square feet of space across Greater Boston than they did at the start of the

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Facebook Faces Antitrust Lawsuit From as Many as 40 U.S. States

A group of U.S. states led by New York is investigating Facebook  (FB) – Get Report for potential antitrust violations, with plans to file a lawsuit against the social media giant.

Citing four sources familiar with the situation, Reuters reported that more than 40 states are behind the lawsuit, which is expected to be filed as soon as next week.

Facebook and other tech giants including Amazon.com  (AMZN) – Get Report, Apple  (AAPL) – Get Report and Alphabet-owned Google  (GOOGL) – Get Report have been accused of using their size and reach to direct consumers to their own products and services, stifling competition in the process.

Specifically, federal and state antitrust authorities are probing whether Facebook is taking advantage of its size and platforms in search and advertising practices – in particular through third-party platforms it owns like Instagram and WhatsApp.

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New York, other states, to sue Facebook next week

By Diane Bartz and Karen Freifeld | Reuters

WASHINGTON – A group of U.S. states led by New York is investigating Facebook Inc for possible antitrust violations and plans to file a lawsuit against the social media giant next week, four sources familiar with the matter said on Wednesday.

The complaint would be the second major lawsuit filed against a Big Tech company this year. The Justice Department sued Alphabet Inc’s Google in October.

More than 40 states plan to sign on to the lawsuit, one source said, without naming them.

Facebook declined to comment. A spokesman for the New York attorney general’s office declined to comment.

The Federal Trade Commission, whose commissioners met on Wednesday, could file a related complaint with an administrative law judge or in district court.

It is not known what the states plan to include in their complaint. One allegation often made against Facebook is

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Senior social-media editor at The Economist | United States

We’re hiring for a job vacancy based in New York


THE ECONOMIST was founded as a print newspaper in 1843, but today we have a growing digital operation and 50m followers on our social-media accounts. Ever more people are encountering our journalism for the first time on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or LinkedIn.

We are seeking an experienced social-media editor, located in the US, to join our global team. This person will be based in our New York bureau, but can work remotely for now.

We are looking for someone who understands The Economist’s brand, and where it fits in the US media landscape. An interest in, and knowledge about, American politics and business will set you apart. Experience with newsletters, push notifications, SEO and tools such as Photoshop is a plus. Ultimately, we are looking for an innovative self-starter with excellent editorial judgment and a keen

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Prop 22 should influence states to provide benefits to gig-workers

  • Californians across the political spectrum voted to pass Proposition 22, affirming the importance of flexible work and the need to include new benefits and protections for gig-workers.
  • It is time to push forward, focused on better, permanent, collaborative solutions for millions of workers across the country.
  • Tony Xu is the co-founder and CEO of DoorDash.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

2020 has been a year of enormous upheaval. So many of the decisions we faced have been incredibly consequential, shaping the kind of future we want for this country. In one of those decisions, voters in California chose to embrace a new future for work in a decision that has taken on even greater importance in light of our nation’s present challenges.

By passing Proposition 22 with 58% of the vote, Californians affirmed the importance

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States In-Vehicle Networking Market Insights Focusing on Primary Trends until 2030| Zebra Technologies Corp., Stanley Healthcare

Pune, Maharashtra, India, November 25 2020 (Wiredrelease) Prudour Pvt. Ltd :The Global States In-Vehicle Networking Market 2021 size will derive growth from climb clinical trials in the up-comping years and delivers a scrupulous analysis of the market by value, production capacity, leading key players, sorts and applications with the region, etc. To boost growth during this time period report analyzes in detail for the potential risks and opportunities, which can be focused on States In-Vehicle Networking market. This research work provides the newest industry data and future trends, allowing you to identify the products and end users driving Revenue growth and profitability. The report assesses the key opportunities in the market and outlines the factors that are and will be driving the growth of the Electronics industry.

Market.us is a company that is engaged in providing various pharmaceutical services such as product development, statistical analysis, and regulatory updates. A thorough

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Comcast faces backlash over plan to charge customers up to $100 for going over a home-internet data limit rolling out to 14 new states



a sign on the side of a brick building: Comcast sign logo in the wall of a building at Universal Studios. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images


© Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images
Comcast sign logo in the wall of a building at Universal Studios. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

  • Comcast is planning on adding data caps to its home-internet plans, starting in January.
  • In 14 states and the District of Columbia, customers with Xfinity internet plans that aren’t unlimited will be constrained to 1.2 TB of data per month, or face overage charges. 
  • Comcast has had data caps in other parts of the country since 2016.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Comcast is adding a data cap for some of its home-internet plans starting in January. The telecommunications giant recently confirmed it’s introducing a limit of 1.2 TB on Xfinity Internet plans in 14 states and the District of Colombia.

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If customers that don’t have unlimited plans go over that cap, they must pay $10 for each additional 50 GB

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Comcast sets data caps for D.C., Northeast states

Comcast initially responded to this trend by giving people relief from data caps, which have already been in place across the central and western U.S. for a few years. That reprieve ended in July, and now the company is expanding its controversial data thresholds to the new region starting next year.

Comcast Xfinity customers in New York, Virginia, Maryland and 11 other northeastern states, plus D.C., will be able to use up to 1.2 terabytes of data each month before they start getting charged more, regardless of what speed plan they use. After that, data will be charged at $10 for 50 gigabytes, up to a maximum of $100 additional each month.

Comcast says with that much data, you could stream five hours of 4K video every day for a month, or take part in 3,500 hours of video conferencing.

“I would think that companies should never be implementing nickel-and-diming

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Comcast to impose home internet data cap of 1.2TB in more than a dozen US states next year

Next year, Comcast plans to charge home internet customers in northeastern US states for going over 1.2TB of data in a month — a cap that’s already in effect for customers on non-unlimited plans in other parts of the country.



logo, company name


In January and February, Comcast will give its Xfinity customers not on an unlimited plan a “credit” for any data usage charges over 1.2TB during those months to ease them into the new limits. Then, starting in March, non-unlimited customers who exceed 1.2TB in a month will be charged $10 per 50GB of data, for a maximum of $100.

Customers who go over the limit will get one “courtesy” credit per 12 months, so if you go over 1.2TB in March, you get a grace period for April. If you go over again in May, you’ll pay $10 for each block of 50GB up to the $100 max. Customers

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States, FTC Set To Sue Facebook Over Acquisitions Of Instagram, WhatsApp

Topline

Federal and state investigators are readying antitrust charges against Facebook that will challenge the social media giant’s acquisition of two major rivals — Instagram and WhatsApp — in the last decade, which the authorities will argue left users with few alternatives to Facebook’s ecosystem, the Washington Post reported.

Key Facts

It could be the toughest regulatory challenge that Facebook has ever faced.

State attorneys general and the Federal Trade Commission are reportedly examining whether the dual acquisitions let users with worse services and lesser privacy protections than if WhatsApp and Instagram had remained independent.

While the lawsuits haven’t been finalized, nearly 40 state attorneys general led by New York’s Letitia James are reportedly on track to file a suit in early December.

The Federal Trade Commission is also

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