Supreme Court Could Soon Limit Employees’ Computer Access At Work

On Monday, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Van Buren v. United States, a criminal case about a federal antihacking law that could have far-reaching implications for workers’ rights.

The case centers around Nathan Van Buren, a former Georgia police sergeant who was convicted of felony computer fraud in violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA). Van Buren was accused of extracting a $6,000 payment to run a license plate search to find out whether a strip club dancer was actually an undercover officer.

An Atlanta federal judge ruled in October 2017 that Van Buren violated the CFAA when he accessed the Georgia Crime Information Center for an improper purpose. Two years later, the Eleventh Circuit Court

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How to stop Google from tracking your computer and limit its data collection of your online history



a man standing in front of a sign: There are several ways you can disable or limit how Google tracks you. Alain Jocard/Getty Images


© Alain Jocard/Getty Images
There are several ways you can disable or limit how Google tracks you. Alain Jocard/Getty Images

  • You can stop Google from tracking your computer by going to your Google Account page and turning off Web & App Activity and Location Services. 
  • Google tracks your activity and location on any device when you’re signed into Google. 
  • If you force Google to stop tracking you, you’ll lose Google’s ability to personalize its services based on your web behavior and location.  
  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

While it may be cliché to say that Google knows everything about you, there’s also a lot of truth to that statement. If Google’s various tracking services are enabled, it knows both where you are and what your online search activity has been.

There are benefits to this tracking, of course — for example, Google can provide information

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Comcast faces backlash over plan to charge customers up to $100 for going over a home-internet data limit rolling out to 14 new states



a sign on the side of a brick building: Comcast sign logo in the wall of a building at Universal Studios. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images


© Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images
Comcast sign logo in the wall of a building at Universal Studios. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

  • Comcast is planning on adding data caps to its home-internet plans, starting in January.
  • In 14 states and the District of Columbia, customers with Xfinity internet plans that aren’t unlimited will be constrained to 1.2 TB of data per month, or face overage charges. 
  • Comcast has had data caps in other parts of the country since 2016.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Comcast is adding a data cap for some of its home-internet plans starting in January. The telecommunications giant recently confirmed it’s introducing a limit of 1.2 TB on Xfinity Internet plans in 14 states and the District of Colombia.

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If customers that don’t have unlimited plans go over that cap, they must pay $10 for each additional 50 GB

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Zoom’s new security feature should limit virtual meeting disruptions

  • Zoom revealed a new security feature that enables users to remove disruptive individuals from meetings.
  • We think the feature’s unveiling will help solidify Zoom’s position as an innovator in the video conferencing space.
  • Insider Intelligence publishes hundreds of insights, charts, and forecasts on the Connectivity & Tech industry with the Connectivity & Tech Briefing. You can learn more about subscribing here.

The video conferencing provider announced the launch of a new security enhancement in a recent blog post, which permits Zoom users to temporarily halt meetings to block the sharing of improper content and remove disruptive individuals from calls, per The Verge. For context, “Zoombombing” refers to the practice of bad actors infiltrating Zoom calls to display distressing or otherwise inappropriate content to meeting participants.

enterprise use of collaboration tools

Zoom revealed a new security feature that enables users to remove disruptive individuals from meetings

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With Zoom usage surging amid the pandemic,

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