Leak left 243 million Brazilians’ medical records and personal info ripe for the picking

The personal information of more than 243 million Brazilians was potentially accessible for at least six months thanks to weakly encoded credentials kept in the source code of the Brazilian Ministry of Health’s website (via ZDNet). The security issue was first reported by Brazilian publication Estadão.

The personal data of anyone who had registered with Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS), Brazil’s national health system, could be viewed. That data included people’s full names, addresses, and telephone numbers, reported Estadão. The database also includes records of living and dead people as the population of Brazil was more than 211 million in 2019, according to The World Bank, which is about 32 million fewer people than the reported number of records that were potentially accessible.

The Ministry of Health’s website stored the encoded access credentials to the database of personal information in its source code, reports Estadão. However, the

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Brig o’Turk left without internet after lorry crash

https://m.geograph.org.uk/photo/2917272

image copyrightGeograph/David Dixon

image captionThe majority of local residents in Brig o’ Turk were cut off from internet access

A village in Stirling was left without internet access for several days after a lorry crashed into a telegraph pole.

The vehicle – owned by a contractor for Stirling Council – left “significant damage” following the incident on Thursday.

Broadband was affected for the majority of residents in Brig o’ Turk and some properties in Invertrossachs.

Openreach carried out a temporary fix but a small number of households are still disconnected.

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One local resident told BBC Scotland the Ripple Retreat – a respite centre for families affected by cancer – had also been impacted by the damage.

In an email to Rural Affairs Minister Mairi Gougeon,

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As many as 89,000 households have left San Francisco since March, the latest sign of an exodus spurred by the pandemic



a group of people standing on top of a mountain: San Francisco. JOSH EDELSON / Contributor/Getty Images


© JOSH EDELSON / Contributor/Getty Images
San Francisco. JOSH EDELSON / Contributor/Getty Images

  • As many as 89,000 households have left San Francisco since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, according to San Francisco-based site Public Comment.
  • Public Comment worked with the United States Postal Service to track requests for a change of address between March 1 and November 1, 2020.
  • The data showed that 124,131 households requested a change of address during that period with at least 34,803 of those requests for moves to a different neighborhood within San Francisco. 
  • That means as many as 89,328 households left the city altogether. Those who left relocated to Las Vegas, Florida, the Denver region, and a city near Portland, Oregon, according to Public Comment. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As many as 89,000 households have moved out of San Francisco since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. 

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Opinion | American leadership could save what is left of the global Internet

Even in many open democratic societies, there is talk of “data sovereignty” and moves to clamp down on U.S. companies and the sharing of data. In Europe, regulators and courts have thrown into doubt the free flow of data between the European Union and the United States. Many other countries are actively working on plans to impose “data localization,” requiring citizens’ data to be stored domestically and placing significant limits on the flow of data across borders.

This desire for greater sovereignty is natural and understandable. Policymakers are grappling with legitimate concerns about the rules that govern content and the use of data at scale. They are also debating the proper size and power of global tech companies. Hovering above these issues is a fundamental question: What do we want the Internet to be?

This is where the Biden administration comes in. An opportunity exists for U.S. leadership to create

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Original iPhone SE, iPhone 6S could be left behind in iOS 15

Not all devices that run iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 may be able to use iOS 15, a report claims, with Apple planning to end operating system updates for the iPhone 6 series and the original iPhone SE in its major 2021 update.

While Apple tries to maintain support for as many iPhones and iPads as possible with its operating system releases, it does occasionally drop some of the older models off the list. For 2021, it is already claimed Apple is preparing to give the heave-ho to some beloved models.

According to Israeli site The Verifier, Apple will be axing support for the iPhone 6S series, including the iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus, in the next major operating system refresh. Furthermore, the original iPhone SE will also share the same fate, with it being left behind on iOS 14.

Apple’s decision whether or not

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Social media promised to connect us, but left us isolated, scared and tribal

Courtesy of Arash Javanbakht, Wayne State University

About a year ago I began to follow my interest in health and fitness on Instagram. Soon I began to see more and more fitness-related accounts, groups, posts and ads. I kept clicking and following, and eventually my Instagram became all about fit people, fitness and motivational material, and advertisements. Does this sound familiar?

While the algorithms and my brain kept me scrolling on the endless feeds, I was reminded of what digital marketers like to say: “Money is in the list.” That is, the more customized your group, people and page follows, the less time and money is needed to sell you related ideas. Instead, brand ambassadors will do the work, spreading products, ideas and ideologies with passion and free of charge.

I’m a psychiatrist who studies anxiety and stress, and I often write about how our politics and culture are mired

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