Second Ontario government computer specialist fired in wake of alleged $11M COVID-19 fraud

A second senior information technology employee has been fired from the Ontario government after the alleged theft of $11 million in pandemic relief funds, the Star has learned.

Shalini Madan was terminated with cause from her $132,513-a-year job as manager of E-Ministries Support at the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services.

She had been suspended with pay since Aug. 11.

Her dismissal came after her husband, Sanjay Madan, was sacked from his $176,608-a-year post as director in the Ministry of Education’s iAccess Solutions Branch in early November.

In documents filed with the Ontario Superior Court, the province alleges that “some or all of” Shalini Madan, Sanjay Madan, their sons Chinmaya Madan and Ujjawal Madan, and associate Vidhan Singh perpetrated “a massive fraud” to siphon COVID-19 aid payments to hundreds of Bank of Montreal and TD accounts.

The government, whose accusations have not been proven in court, alleges “damages for fraud,

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US Supreme Court hears Van Buren appeal arguments in light of Computer Fraud and Abuse Act ambiguity


Adam Bannister

30 November 2020 at 16:53 UTC

Updated: 30 November 2020 at 17:46 UTC

Ruling over interpretation of ageing law could have a chilling or liberating effect on security research

US Supreme Court hears Van Buren appeal arguments in light of Computer Fraud and Abuse Act ambiguity

The US Supreme Court has begun hearing arguments regarding a case that could have seismic ramifications for the future of security research.

From today (November 30), the country’s highest court is considering an appeal launched by police officer Nathan Van Buren over his 2017 conviction on charges including violation of The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

Passed in 1986 in an era far removed from today’s hyper-connected world, the federal act is used by law enforcement to convict cybercriminals, fraudsters, and white-collar crooks, and in civil actions by businesses seeking remedies for the theft of trade secrets.

Van Buren, a former Georgia state police officer, was arrested after being induced by undercover FBI agents into running a

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Voter fraud: Social media is playing whack-a-mole with a bunch of bogus claims

Voter Fraud

The 2020 election wasn’t stolen.


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With Michigan, Nevada and Pennsylvania certifying their election results this week, President-elect Joe Biden is a step closer to being officially declared the next president of the United States after the election was called on Nov. 7. That fact hasn’t stopped people on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube from claiming President Donald Trump was the election’s true winner. 

Social media is littered with bogus claims — many of them amplified by President Trump — that voter fraud ran rampant, that a supercomputer changed votes and that thousands of zombies voted. None of this is remotely true. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, created by the Trump administration to protect US computer and communications networks against hackers, including threats to elections, called the vote “the most secure in American history.” Election officials across the country have echoed that assessment. (Trump fired Christopher Krebs, the director

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Joyy rejects short-seller fraud claim that sent its shares plunging

Chinese social media platform Joyy on Thursday tried to fend off an attack by short-seller Muddy Waters, saying a report that sent its share price plunging was full of “errors, unsubstantiated statements, and misleading conclusions.”



a man looking at the camera: Carson Block, chief investment officer and co-founder of Muddy Waters Capital LLC, speaks during the Sohn Hong Kong Conference in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, June 7, 2017. Shares of Man Wah Holdings Ltd. sank in Hong Kong after Muddy Waters questioned the firms profitability. Photographer: Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Carson Block, chief investment officer and co-founder of Muddy Waters Capital LLC, speaks during the Sohn Hong Kong Conference in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, June 7, 2017. Shares of Man Wah Holdings Ltd. sank in Hong Kong after Muddy Waters questioned the firms profitability. Photographer: Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Shares in Joyy closed down more than 26% in New York on Wednesday after Muddy Waters published its report accusing the company of making up revenues and labeling the business “a multibillion-dollar fraud.” The shares recovered a lot of those losses on Thursday, closing up nearly 17%.

The fraud allegations come just days after Baidu, China’s dominant search engine,

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Video Giant Joyy Dives After Muddy Waters Labels It a Fraud

(Bloomberg) — Joyy Inc.’s shares tumbled the most ever after short-seller Muddy Waters called it a “fraud tech company,” casting doubt over a pioneer of Chinese livestreaming that’s selling its local video business to Baidu Inc.

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Muddy Waters Research founder Carson Block said Joyy’s livestreaming service YY is “guilty of bot forming, creating fake transactions and having fake users.” The report, published Wednesday, came days after Baidu agreed to buy YY for $3.6 billion. Baidu representatives had no immediate comment. Joyy fired back on Thursday, saying the report was replete with errors and demonstrated a lack of understanding of the industry.

In a 71-page report, Muddy Waters alleged evidence of revenue inflation: livestreamers who got paid during long periods of absence or inactivity; mis-matches with local credit reports it obtained; and payments originating from company servers. Muddy Waters also said it holds a short position in Joyy, meaning

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Post-election, extremists use fringe social networks to push fraud claims, violence

Efforts by Facebook and Twitter to squash false claims of election fraud are hitting a big obstacle: The messages are running wild on smaller fringe networks popular among the far right — then boomeranging back onto the mainstream platforms.

Extremist groups, white nationalists and conspiracy theorists — some claiming ties to QAnon, which alleges a so-called deep-state plot to undermine Donald Trump — have taken to encrypted messaging apps and online message boards.

There, they promote viral videos of unproven voter fraud, urge supporters to ready their guns in support of Trump and push anti-Semitic and racist claims about election officials, according to POLITICO’s review of multiple Telegram channels, 4Chan discussions and conversations on Parler, a social network favored by more mainstream conservatives.

Such discussions have skyrocketed on these alternative platforms since the Nov. 3 election, creating a safe harbor for those pushing claims of fraud and a venue to

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Trump’s vote fraud claims go viral on social media despite curbs



graphical user interface, text, application: Tweets by President Donald Trump on Saturday, flagged by the social media platform as containing information about the election that may be misleading.


© Photograph: Twitter/PA
Tweets by President Donald Trump on Saturday, flagged by the social media platform as containing information about the election that may be misleading.

False or misleading claims of electoral fraud are going viral on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, even as the platforms continue to implement special measures aimed at reducing the spread of misinformation around the US presidential election.

Major social media platforms are nominally cracking down on misinformation, prominently displaying election results or appending warning labels to posts by Donald Trump that seek to undermine the validity of the vote.

According to social analytics platforms such as NewsWhip and CrowdTangle, however, claims about voting irregularities have become among the most-shared content on Facebook.

The top three posts are all from Donald Trump, according to CrowdTangle: one alleges “Fake Votes” in Nevada, where Trump trails Joe Biden by 6,000 votes; another claims Georgia, where Trump trails

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Misinformation about election fraud has flooded the internet. Here’s how to spot false reports

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Election security experts warned for months that misinformation would ramp up after election day to cast doubt on the vote with falsehoods.


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This story is part of Elections 2020, CNET’s coverage of the voting in November and its aftermath.

Former Vice President Joe Biden has beaten President Donald Trump in a contest punctuated with wild rumors, false reports and premature declarations of victory. The end of the election, however, hasn’t meant an end to the misinformation.

Social media posts from the sitting president that falsely claim the election was stolen from him have swept through the internet, and Trump has continued to tweet and retweet items that contain disputed information, which Twitter has labeled. Additionally, baseless claims of election fraud from a variety of sources have also swept Twitter, as well as YouTube and Facebook. 

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Trump’s vote fraud claims go viral on social media despite curbs | US news

False or misleading claims of electoral fraud are going viral on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube, even as the platforms continue to implement special measures aimed at reducing the spread of misinformation around the US presidential election.

Major social media platforms are nominally cracking down on misinformation, prominently displaying election results or appending warning labels to posts by Donald Trump that seek to undermine the validity of the vote.

According to social analytics platforms such as NewsWhip and CrowdTangle, however, claims about voting irregularities have become among the most-shared content on Facebook.

The top three posts are all from Donald Trump, according to CrowdTangle: one alleges “Fake Votes” in Nevada, where Trump trails Joe Biden by 36,000 votes; another claims Georgia, where Trump trails by 13,000 votes pending a recount, will be a “big presidential win”; and a third says “a very large number of ballots” will be affected by “threshold

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