Facebook could face a state antitrust lawsuit as soon as next week

Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, October 23, 2019.

Erin Scott | Reuters

State attorneys general are preparing to file an antitrust lawsuit against Facebook as soon as next week, sources familiar with the matter told CNBC’s Ylan Mui. At least 20 to 30 states could join in, the sources said.

The news comes as multiple outlets have reported the Federal Trade Commission is likely to file its own antitrust lawsuit against the social media giant. It’s still unclear where the FTC may choose to bring a case — either in federal court or before its administrative law judge. If it chooses to bring the case in-house, it cannot combine its lawsuit with the states. Reuters previously reported the states were planning an antitrust case against Facebook.

Both the FTC and the state AGs, led by New York’s Letitia James,

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On Facebook, Comments About ‘Whites,’ ‘Men,’ And ‘Americans’ Will Face Less Moderation

Topline

Facebook has shifted a long-standing policy of so-called “race-blind” hate speech moderation to consider the detection and deletion of certain comments about “whites,” “men,” and “Americans” low-priority compared to those about historically marginalized groups.  

Key Facts

First reported by The Washington Post on Thursday morning and confirmed to Forbes by a Facebook spokesperson, Facebook says it has been working on Project WoW—an effort to better detect and delete content that it considers to be “the worst of the worst”—since 2019.

Facebook now differentiates between slurs directed toward certain groups, like Blacks, Muslims, the LGBTQ+ community and Jews, and those who haven’t been historically marginalized. 

As of now, the application is relatively limited: Facebook has changed its proactive technology to stop identifying a certain subset of comments about “Whites,” “men” and “Americans” that would be taken down if they referenced other groups. 

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IQST – iQSTEL and ALYI Meet Face Mask to Face Mask Today in Dallas at ReVolt Electric Motorcycle Design Lab

NEW YORK, Dec. 3, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — iQSTEL, Inc. (USOTC: IQST), an international telecommunication, technology and fintech service provider, and Alternet Systems, Inc. (USOTC: ALYI), an electric vehicle (EV) innovator, meet today to advance a previously announced joint design program to codevelop two-way device communication solutions specific to the EV operating environment. Today, the two companies are meeting face to face in Dallas, in the design lab of ALYI’s EV engineering partner, MODUS. The two companies have agreed in advance to specific COVID19 mitigation protocols.

 

 

IQST and ALYI recently announced a letter of intent (LOI) agreement for IQST’s Internet of Things (IoT) development team to combine efforts with ALYI’s EV engineering and design program to codevelop two-way device communication solutions specific to the EV operating environment.

ALYI’s first generation EV program includes multiple electric motorcycles. One is designed for, among other applications, utilization within the rideshare (exemplified by

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Facebook and Google May Face 4 New Antitrust Lawsuits

Tech giants Facebook  (FB) – Get Report and Google  (GOOGL) – Get Report could face as many as four new antitrust lawsuits in January, a media report says.

Shares of Facebook at last check were down 1.5% to $273.79. Google slipped  2% to $1752.18.

Federal and state antitrust authorities are preparing to file new lawsuits against Google for abuse of its competitive position in search and advertising practices, people familiar with the matter told the Wall Street Journal. Facebook faces action regarding its social-media dominance, the paper reported.

Last month, the U.S. Department of Justice filed a long-awaited antitrust case against Google.

The DoJ said the action was brought to “restrain Google from unlawfully maintaining monopolies in the markets for general search services, search advertising, and general search text advertising in the United States through anticompetitive and exclusionary practices, and to remedy the effects of this

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Edinson Cavani could face three-game ban as FA investigates social media post

Edinson Cavani, the Manchester United striker, could face a three-game ban if the Football Association deems that he used discriminatory or racist language in an Instagram story shared from his account on Sunday evening.



Edinson Cavani who is smiling and looking at the camera: Photograph: Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Getty Images

The FA has confirmed it is investigating the post, which was published shortly after United’s 3-2 win over Southampton, in which Cavani scored two goals after coming on as a half-time substitute.

Related: Edinson Cavani inspires Manchester United to comeback at Southampton

In the post – which was later deleted – the words “gracias negrito!” are used to thank a follower congratulating Cavani on his performance in the match at St. Mary’s.

Social media postings are covered by FA Rule E3, and if a comment is deemed to include a reference to a person’s ethnic origin, colour, race or nationality, then that will be regarded as a potential

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Social media reaction on Sand Springs passing face covering ordinance |

Below are some of the comments from the Leader’s Facebook page regarding Sand Springs City Council passing a face covering ordinance:

“I would like to see a study done on how people wearing mask for a month, if our numbers go down. I’m glad they passed it. One Sandite dying is one too many. Does this include casino in SS and QT in Sand Springs, people are going in to QT all the time without mask. Please folks let’s just give this a chance to save another person’s life. That’s all anyone is asking for. It’s not infringing on your rights! It’s about how much you care for others and

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Tech giants face fines or even break-up if they breach new rules: EU’s Breton

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Tech giants that break new EU rules aimed at curbing their powers could face fines, be ordered to change their practices or even be forced to break up their European businesses, the bloc’s digital chief Thierry Breton said on Wednesday.

Breton’s comments come two weeks before he is due to present draft rules known as the Digital Services Act (DSA) and Digital Markets Act (DMA), which are likely to affect big U.S. players Google, Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Microsoft.

The DSA will force tech companies to explain how their algorithms work, open up their advertising archives to regulators and researchers, and do more to tackle hate speech, harmful content and counterfeit products on their platforms.

The DMA takes aim at online gatekeepers with a list of requirements, such as sharing certain kinds of data with rivals and regulators; and outlawed practices, such as favouring their own services.

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Software developers face mounting pressure in 2021

The former Forrester Research Director Chris Mines predicted in 2019 that the world of software development was set for some big changes in 2020. We had no idea that a year later, almost every development shop would be a remote development shop. It makes the curated list of “remote-friendly” companies on GitHub a nostalgic reminder of a simpler, pre-pandemic time. Most developers adjusted well to the changes in 2020, certainly compared to other professions. Working hours increased and work weeks lengthened, but our digital world didn’t come crashing down like other sectors of the global economy. 

Now, however, the sprint is turning into a marathon, and as executives demand that developers pick up the pace of digital transformation, we are starting to see the stress fractures in mainstream software delivery grow. As remote development bleeds into mid-2021 and beyond, expect larger disruptions to the way development teams work, especially as

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Britain’s telcos face fines if they use suppliers deemed high-risk, like Huawei

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s telecoms companies could be fined up to 10% of turnover or 100,000 pounds ($133,140) a day if they contravene a ban on using equipment made by China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd under a new law put forward on Tuesday.

FILE PHOTO: A smartphone with the Huawei and 5G network logo is seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration picture taken January 29, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

The Telecommunications (Security) Bill will boost the security standards of the UK’s telecoms networks and remove the threat of high-risk vendors, the government said.

Britain in July decided to ban the use of Huawei in 5G networks from the end of 2027 because of concerns that U.S. sanctions on chip technology meant the Chinese company would not be a reliable supplier.

The bill aims to enshrine that decision in law and manage any risks from other high-risk vendors in the

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Huawei selling Honor phone brand in face of US sanctions

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei is selling its budget-price Honor smartphone brand in an effort to rescue the struggling business from damaging U.S. sanctions imposed on its parent company.

The move announced Tuesday is aimed at reviving Honor by separating it from Huawei’s network equipment and other businesses, which Washington says are a security threat, an accusation Huawei denies. They are under sanctions that block access to most U.S. processor chips and other technology.

Huawei Technologies Ltd.’s announcement gave no financial details but said the company will have no ownership stake once the sale is completed. Huawei will retain its flagship Huawei smartphone brand.


The buyer is a company formed by a technology enterprise owned by the government of the southern city of Shenzhen, where Huawei is headquartered, with a group of Honor retailers. Earlier news reports on rumors of a possible sale put the price as high

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