Apple hires Intel’s chief diversity officer

Intel’s chief diversity and inclusion officer Barbara Whye is leaving the company. Whye, who was also corporate vice president of social impact, had been in the role since 2017, following the departure of Danielle Brown for Google.



a sign on the side of a building: Intel's chief diversity and inclusion officer is leaving. Getty Images


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Intel’s chief diversity and inclusion officer is leaving. Getty Images

Whye will join Apple as its new vice president of inclusion and diversity in 2021, the iPhone maker said late Thursday, confirming an earlier report by Fortune. The position has been vacant since June when Christie Smith, who had served as Apple’s inclusion and diversity chief since 2017, departed the company.

“An engineer by training and a globally recognized leader on issues of representation in the technology industry, Barbara has spent 25 years at Intel, helping the company make meaningful and durable positive change,” Apple said in a statement. “Now, she will bring her immense talents and

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Apple hires Intel’s head of diversity to fill same role starting 2021

Apple on Thursday announced the hire of Intel Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Barbara Whye, who will join the Cupertino tech giant in a similar position early next year.

At Apple, Whye will serve as vice president of inclusion and diversity, replacing former diversity chief Christie Smith, reports Fortune. Smith departed in June after nearly three years in role.

“An engineer by training and a globally-recognized leader on issues of representation in the technology industry, Barbara has spent 25 years at Intel, helping the company make meaningful and durable positive change,” said Apple spokesperson Kristin Huguet. “Now, she will bring her immense talents and deep experience to Apple, expanding our companywide effort to hire, develop and retain the world-class talent, at all levels, that reflects the communities we serve.”

Whye will become Apple’s third diversity officer in just under four years. Smith assumed the role after former department

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Stanford rushes to comply with Trump executive order limiting diversity training

Stanford University is facing backlash from educators, students, and alumni for recently taking action to follow a Trump executive order that limits acknowledging the history of structural racism in the United States. Directives on how to modify diversity training were issued despite the fact that the order is likely to be rescinded in January when the new administration takes over. In some ways, a checklist issued to Stanford faculty appears to go beyond the Trump executive order, prohibiting any acknowledgment that “systemic racism exists at Stanford.”

The Stanford University checklist explicitly prohibits diversity training that discusses whether the United States is fundamentally racist or sexist or whether meritocracy is racist, sexist, or made by one race to oppress another. Additional documents from the university’s human resources department label diversity training related to critical race theory, white privilege, systemic racism, and racial humility as subject to review.

Stanford Assistant Vice President

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Why AI can’t move forward without diversity, equity, and inclusion

The need to pursue racial justice is more urgent than ever, especially in the technology industry. The far-reaching scope and power of machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) means that any gender and racial bias at the source is multiplied to the nth power in businesses and out in the world. The impact those technology biases have on society as a whole can’t be underestimated.

When decision-makers in tech companies simply don’t reflect the diversity of the general population, it profoundly affects how AI/ML products are conceived, developed, and implemented. Evolve, presented by VentureBeat on December 8th, is a 90-minute event exploring bias, racism, and the lack of diversity across AI product development and management, and why these issues can’t be ignored.

“A lot has been happening in 2020, from working remotely to the Black Lives Matter movement, and that has made everybody realize that diversity, equity, and

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