The watchdog digging up big tech’s dirt

There’s still much that we don’t know about the decisions that shape our daily experiences on Facebook, Google, and other online platforms, but a single watchdog nonprofit group, the Tech Transparency Project (TTP), has revealed a wealth of information that these companies have tried to keep hidden.



"We want to expose some of the things that platforms said they’re going to be doing and show that they’re not following up on those promises," says Katie Paul, head of the Tech Transparency Project.


© Jason Alden
“We want to expose some of the things that platforms said they’re going to be doing and show that they’re not following up on those promises,” says Katie Paul, head of the Tech Transparency Project.

When news stories describe the internal machinations at big tech companies, findings from TTP often inform much of that reporting. In the past few months alone, TTP has unearthed information on dangerous Facebook groups, including militias and presidential election conspiracy theorists; Facebook and Google’s problematic conduct toward the press; and, perhaps most revealingly, communications between tech executives and government officials.

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The Dirt: A $22 million residential, retail development could be coming to downtown Spokane

A residential and commercial development could be coming to the former Umpqua Bank site in downtown Spokane.

Seattle-based architecture and design firm GGLO filed a preliminary application with the city to potentially build the six-story, 129,000-square-foot mixed-use development on two parcels of land at 206 and 214 W. Riverside Ave.

The 214 Riverside project – to which it’s referred in the application – will have 139 one- and two-bedroom units, 63 parking spaces and 1,250 square feet of lobby and amenity space. The construction cost is an estimated $22 million, according to documents filed with the city.

The 214 Riverside project will be required to undergo an environmental review with the Washington State Department of Ecology. A water study by the city of Spokane Water Department will also be required prior to construction to ensure design standards are met and how the development would affect the city’s water system, according

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