U.S. House Democrats Adopt Mobile Internet Voting for Leadership Contests | World News

(Reuters) – U.S. lawmakers used a mobile phone app over the last two weeks to remotely cast votes for the first time, according to technologists and some involved in the process, embracing technology to facilitate an internal party leadership contest.

The development marks a shift in how Congress is adapting to the internet, especially in the midst of a pandemic. Use of the app, named Markup ERVS, had not been publicly disclosed before Friday.

A total of 230 House of Representatives Democrats logged into Markup on their government-provided iPhones to cast votes stating their preference for House speaker, who will be elected by the full chamber early next month, said Markup spokesperson Colby Redmond.

The House Democrats also chose their caucus chair and committee heads through the app, which transfers data to staff in Washington.

Earlier this year, the House changed its procedures for voting on legislation by the full

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Joe Biden Won the Battle, but Democrats Are Losing the Social Media War

As the 2020 election hit its homestretch, Joe Biden’s digital team began seeing alarming trends online.

Posts about the candidate’s son Hunter Biden and the contents of his laptops were spreading at incredible rates. Many of the posts were misleading, at best. Biden’s campaign had set up a comprehensive monitoring system to track the proliferation of disinformation across various platforms. And they’d seen their fair share of rumor, innuendo, and smear fly across the internet before. But this was entirely different in its scope. According to their data, there was more social chatter happening around the Hunter Biden story than there had been around stories about Hillary Clinton’s emails during the last month of the 2016 campaign.

Fearing a redux of that disastrous end-of-the-campaign implosion, the team dove further into the research. What they found there was more assuring. While the Hunter Biden story had taken off on Facebook, YouTube,

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Have Senior Democrats Raised Concerns About the Smartmatic Voting Software, as Trump’s Lawyer Claims?

A lawyer representing President Donald Trump in his legal battle challenging the outcome of the presidential election recently said that some congressional Democrats raised concerns in the past about the trustworthiness of election software used in several states.



Rudy Giuliani, Bernard Kerik standing in front of a sign: Rudy Giuliani, a lawyer for President Donald Trump, speaks to the media at a press conference held in the back parking lot of Four Seasons Total Landscaping on November 7, 2020, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On Sunday, Giuliani and another attorney for Trump, Sidney Powell, spoke with Fox News' Maria Bartiromo to discuss allegations of widespread voter fraud during the 2020 election.


© Chris McGrath/Getty
Rudy Giuliani, a lawyer for President Donald Trump, speaks to the media at a press conference held in the back parking lot of Four Seasons Total Landscaping on November 7, 2020, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. On Sunday, Giuliani and another attorney for Trump, Sidney Powell, spoke with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo to discuss allegations of widespread voter fraud during the 2020 election.

Election officials use Dominion Voting Systems in 28 states, including several key battleground states. Members of Trump’s legal team have alleged that the company uses voting software that can be controlled by operators overseas to “steal” elections, much as they alleged the election was stolen from Trump.

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The Technology 202: Democrats warn Big Tech’s extended ad bans could hurt their chances in Georgia

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee’s executive director Scott Fairchild criticized the decisions, saying the bans “amount to unacceptable voter suppression.” 

Tech companies seeking to quash election disinformation are in a bind. 

On the one hand, ads can help candidates on both sides get information to potential voters. Fairchild warned in a statement that the move could actively harm efforts to inform voters about the runoffs. He called for an exemption for ads in Georgia over the next two months. 

But companies are also scrambling to extend what were meant to be temporary changes amid a chaotic and uncertain political environment in which President Trump is refusing to concede and makes baseless claims of election fraud. It’s unclear if the companies can sustain the pace of enforcement they have had in the last week, my colleague Elizabeth Dwoskin reports. 

Facebook and Google initially indicated the ad bans would last about a

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AOC: Democrats lost congressional seats because of lack of online ads

  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said Democrats lost seats in the Senate and House because of a lack of online advertising, including on Facebook.
  • “If you’re not spending $200,000 on Facebook with fund-raising, persuasion, volunteer recruitment, get-out-the-vote the week before the election, you are not firing on all cylinders,” she told the New York Times. “And not a single one of these campaigns were firing on all cylinders.”
  • The comments come as Ocasio-Cortez and other progressives field blame from centrist Democrats who say their causes and messaging caused the party to lose seats in the House and Senate.
  • Ocasio-Cortez pushed back and said the upset was instead due to a lack of a robust digital ad campaigns. She said in a tweet last week that some campaigns spent $0 on digital advertising the week before the election.
  • Democrats maintain control of the House, but they lost a number of incumbent congresspeople in
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