Tony Hsieh, Man Who Introduced Advertising to the Internet, Dead at 46

Tony Hsieh, the former CEO of Zappos.com who pioneered internet advertising and revolutionized the shoe business, died on Friday aged 46. He was with family at the time.



Tony Hsieh standing on a stage: Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh speaks onstage during day 1 of the 2015 Life is Beautiful festival on September 25, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Hsieh passed away on Friday.


© FilmMagic/Getty Images
Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh speaks onstage during day 1 of the 2015 Life is Beautiful festival on September 25, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Hsieh passed away on Friday.

Hsieh had retired from Zappos, the iconic online shoe retailer, earlier this year after 21 years. He’d also been a key figure in revitalizing downtown Las Vegas, as well as an inspiration to other entrepreneurs.

“It is with very heavy hearts that we are sharing some very sad news with all of you, as we have learned that Tony passed away earlier today,” Zappos CEO Kedar Deshpande said in a letter posted to the company’s website.

Celebrities, Sports And Iconic Figures We Lost In 2020: Alex Trebek, Kobe Bryant, John

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Twitter Fleets prove social-media innovation is dead

  •  Twitter just rolled out its version of temporary stories, joining Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and everyone else. 
  • All of the social-media apps are cannibalizing each others’ best features to try and be all things to all people. 
  • But we don’t need a dozen ‘superapps,’ and adding Fleets won’t help Twitter solve the problems it is already facing. 
  • Chris Stokel-Walker is a freelance journalist and the author of “YouTubers: How YouTube shook up TV and created a new generation of stars”, and the upcoming book “TikTok Boom: China, the US and the Superpower Race for Social Media.” 
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Crack open the warm champagne: another short-form, impermanent content stream that looks just like every short-form, impermanent content stream has launched. 

The newest iteration comes from Twitter, which rolled out the new Fleets feature to

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On-premises data warehouses are dead

Global Market Insights estimates that cloud providers will host the majority of data warehousing loads by 2025. But don’t take their word for it. Gartner estimates that 30 percent of data warehousing workloads now run in the cloud and that this will grow to two-thirds by 2024. Just a few years ago in 2016 the figure was less than 7 percent, also according to Gartner.   

None of this should be a surprise. Even the core data warehouse technology providers have seen this trend and are spending the majority of their R&D budgets to build solutions for public cloud providers. Moreover, the public cloud providers themselves have “company killing” products, such as AWS’s RedShift, a columnar database designed to compete with the larger enterprise data warehouse players. 

Past impediments to building data warehouses and data marts on public clouds included a perception that security was still an issue on public clouds.

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The much-hyped ‘$35,000’ Tesla Model 3 is dead

See ya, $35,000 Model 3.


Tesla

Remember when the Tesla Model 3 was just a twinkle in CEO Elon Musk’s eye? The executive promised a game-changing electric sedan that would also be affordable for the average buyer — as in $35,000 before federal tax credits.

While there’s definitely a case to make on how the Model 3 has shaped the automotive industry at large, the affordability part remains in question, especially noting the $35,000 Model 3 is dead and gone. Electrek reported Monday, citing unnamed sources, that it’s no longer possible to order the entry-level Model 3. Though, if we’re being totally factual, the actual $35,000 Model 3 went away a long time ago.

Remember, Tesla launched the $35,000 car in 2019 long after the more expensive versions launched. However, just months later,

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Solar-powered trailers help fill internet dead zones in Sherman County

Ryan LeBlanc installs an antenna on a solar-powered trailer in Moro, Ore., Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020. Sherman County is using the trailers to help fill internet dead zones.

Ryan LeBlanc installs an antenna on a solar-powered trailer in Moro, Ore., Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020. Sherman County is using the trailers to help fill internet dead zones.

Bradley W. Parks / OPB

Sherman County is turning to tiny, shiny, sun-powered trailers to fill gaps in high-speed internet coverage in Oregon’s windswept wheat country.

The coronavirus brought a new sense of urgency to the long-standing issue of bringing rural communities online.

As distance learning, remote work and telemedicine took root this spring, some Sherman County residents were still relying on satellite internet or even dial-up, seeing download speeds of 1 or 2 MB per second (Mbps). That’s far below the federal minimum standard of 25 Mbps and hardly capable of supporting a Zoom meeting.

Though Sherman County has worked for years to upgrade its internet system, the pandemic laid bare an issue plaguing rural communities everywhere.

“There’s places that just

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In Wi-Fi ‘Dead Zones,’ Rural Students Can’t Log On to Virtual School

Shekinah and Orlandria Lennon were sitting at their kitchen table this fall, taking online classes, when video of their teachers and fellow students suddenly froze on their laptop screens. The wireless antenna on the roof had stopped working, and it could not be fixed.

Desperate for a solution, their mother called five broadband companies, trying to get connections for their home in Orrum, N.C., a rural community of fewer than 100 people with no grocery store or traffic lights.

All the companies gave the same answer: Service is not available in your area.

The response is the same across broad stretches of Robeson County, N.C., a swath of small towns and rural places like Orrum dotted among soybean fields and hog farms on the South Carolina border. About 20,000 of the county’s homes, or 43 percent of all households, have no internet connection.

The technology gap has prompted teachers to

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No signal: Internet ‘dead zones’ cut rural students off from virtual classes.

Shekinah and Orlandria Lennon were sitting at their kitchen table this fall, taking online classes, when video of their teachers and fellow students suddenly froze on their laptop screens. The wireless antenna on the roof had stopped working, and it couldn’t be fixed.

Desperate for a solution, their mother called five broadband companies, trying to get connections for their home in Orrum, N.C., a rural community of fewer than 100 people with no grocery store or traffic lights.

All the companies gave the same answer: Service is not available in your area.

“It’s not fair,” said Shekinah, 17. “I don’t think just the people who live in the city should have internet. We need it in the country, too.”

Millions of American students are grappling with the same challenges, learning remotely without adequate home internet service. About 15 million K-12 students lived in households without adequate online connectivity or remote

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DNS cache poisoning, the Internet attack from 2008, is back from the dead

Extreme close-up photograph of Web browser window.

In 2008, researcher Dan Kaminsky revealed one of the more severe Internet security threats ever: a weakness in the domain name system that made it possible for attackers to send users en masse to imposter sites instead of the real ones belonging to Google, Bank of America, or anyone else. With industrywide coordination, thousands of DNS providers around the world installed a fix that averted this doomsday scenario.

Now, Kaminsky’s DNS cache poisoning attack is back. Researchers on Wednesday presented a new technique that can once again cause DNS resolvers to return maliciously spoofed IP addresses instead of the site that rightfully corresponds to a domain name.

“This is a pretty big advancement that is similar to Kaminsky’s attack for some resolvers, depending on how [they’re] actually run,” said Nick Sullivan, head of research at Cloudflare, a content-delivery network that operates the 1.1.1.1 DNS service. “This is amongst the most

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