IBM to cut 10,000 jobs in Europe, most in UK, Germany: Bloomberg

  • Tech giant IBM plans to cut around 1 in 5 jobs across Europe, sources close to the matter told Bloomberg on Wednesday.
  • About 10,000 jobs face the axe, they said.
  • The UK and Germany will see the most job cuts, the sources said, and roles in its legacy managed-infrastructure IT services business are most at risk.
  • An IBM spokesperson told the publication that its staffing decisions “are made to provide the best support to our customers in adopting an open hybrid cloud platform and AI capabilities.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Tech giant IBM is planning to cut about 10,000 jobs in Europe, Bloomberg reported Wednesday.

The cuts will affect around 1 in 5 staff in the region, sources close to the matter told the publication.

The UK and Germany will see the most job cuts, but staff in Poland, Slovakia, Italy, and Belgium will also lose their

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Los Alamos Scientists Say Their New Technology Could Cut Methane Emissions By 90%

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed new technology that they say could reduce emissions of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, by up to 90%. 

In work funded by the US Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy (ARPA-E), a team of three has devised machine learning codes that analyze the speed and direction of wind currents to trace methane leaks back to their sources. 

The only real hardware involved is a small methane sensor developed by a California startup, Aeris Technologies, Inc. — although the scientists’ algorithms can be used to analyze the data coming off almost any gas and wind sensor, including, potentially, sensors attached to cars or drones. 

Currently available methods to detect methane leaks, such as infrared scanners, are cost-prohibitive at scale. The new technology raises the possibility that

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Sorrento Therapeutics Plans to Cut Development of Its Coronavirus Vaccine if the Leaders’ Vaccines Work

Sorrento Therapeutics (NASDAQ:SRNE) is considerably behind Pfizer (NYSE:PFE), BioNTech (NASDAQ:BNTX)Moderna (NASDAQ:MRNA), and the rest of the leaders in the race to develop a coronavirus vaccine. While multiple vaccines have completed phase 3 clinical trials or will in the coming months, Sorrento’s lead vaccine, T-VIVA-19, hasn’t even entered clinical trials yet.

In this video from Motley Fool Live recorded on Nov. 12, Henry Ji, chairman, president, and CEO of Sorrento, talks about the potential advantages of the biotech’s vaccine. But given how far behind Sorrento is, he admits the company is watching the leaders and might stop development if it’s clear there won’t be room for latecomers.

Brian Orelli: You do have a vaccine that you’re working on called T-VIVA-19. How does that work, and then what are the advantages of that over the current late-stage vaccines that are being tested right now?

Henry Ji:

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Apple to cut app store fees as legal scrutiny intensifies

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Apple will cut its app store commissions in half for most developers beginning next year amid an intensifying debate about whether the iPhone maker has been using the fees to unfairly fatten its profits and stifle rivals competing against its own music, video, and other subscription services.

The concession announced Wednesday will lower Apple’s commissions for in-app subscriptions and other purchases from the 30% rate that has been in place since 2008 to 15%, effective Jan. 1. But the discount will only apply to developers with app store revenue up to $1 million annually — a threshold that excludes the makers of some of the most popular apps downloaded on iPhones, iPads and other Apple devices.

That group includes two of Apple’s fiercest critics, music streaming service Spotify, and Epic, the maker of the popular Fortnite video game.

Both those companies have helped spur increasing

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Apple to Cut App Store Fees in Half for Most Developers

The Cupertino, California-based technology giant said it’s making the change to help small developers financially and to provide a way for them to invest in their businesses amid the economic struggles caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Apple has faced ongoing scrutiny from government regulators and criticism from developers about the percentage of revenue it takes for App Store purchases. Alphabet Inc.’s Google also charges similar fees to developers on its Android app store.

Earlier: Apple Loosens App Store Rules a Bit After Developer Backlash

Income from app developers has been key to Apple’s growing services business, which reached almost $54 billion in revenue in fiscal 2020. The App Store is one of several products and offerings that make up the services unit, but is the biggest revenue driver, according to Toni Sacconaghi, an analyst at Sanford C Bernstein. He estimates the App Store alone will bring in $18.7 billion in

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No signal: Internet ‘dead zones’ cut rural students off from virtual classes.

Shekinah and Orlandria Lennon were sitting at their kitchen table this fall, taking online classes, when video of their teachers and fellow students suddenly froze on their laptop screens. The wireless antenna on the roof had stopped working, and it couldn’t be fixed.

Desperate for a solution, their mother called five broadband companies, trying to get connections for their home in Orrum, N.C., a rural community of fewer than 100 people with no grocery store or traffic lights.

All the companies gave the same answer: Service is not available in your area.

“It’s not fair,” said Shekinah, 17. “I don’t think just the people who live in the city should have internet. We need it in the country, too.”

Millions of American students are grappling with the same challenges, learning remotely without adequate home internet service. About 15 million K-12 students lived in households without adequate online connectivity or remote

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Bootstrapped Clearfind wants to cut your software spend, for a small fee

Software is eating the world, and that grub can be costly. As the market for enterprise tools and software continues to balloon, organizations are spending more and more on that software across an increasingly complicated and rapidly evolving landscape.

That’s where Clearfind comes in.

Clearfind was founded (and bootstrapped) by James Layfield and Jocelyn Simons. The startup aims to provide clarity and transparency to organizations looking to buy enterprise software. Over the past two years, Clearfind has been building out its backend, which is a mix of machine learning and humans, to distill a software offering down to its features.

When clients join the Clearfind platform, they give the startup access to their backend through integrations with products like Sage, Quickbooks, SAP, etc. so that Clearfind can take a look at their overall software spend. CIOs or CTOs can then see if there are any redundancies in their current software

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