Hackers try to penetrate the vital ‘cold chain’ for coronavirus vaccines, security team reports

The hackers took measures to hide their tracks, and the cyber-sleuths did not name which state might be behind the campaign.

The IBM team said it was not known why the hackers were trying to penetrate the systems. It suggested that the intruders might want to steal information, glean details about technology or contracts, create confusion and distrust, or disrupt the vaccine supply chains.

The hackers probably sought “advanced insight into the purchase and movement of a vaccine that can impact life and the global economy,” the IBM team said.

Because there was “no clear path to a cash-out” as there is in a ransomware attack, there was an increased likelihood of a state actor’s being involved, IBM said. However, the IBM investigators cautioned, it was still possible that criminals could be looking for ways to illegally obtain “a hot black-market commodity” such as an initially scarce vaccine.

The new

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Hackers targeting supply chain that keeps coronavirus vaccines cold, experts warn

Hackers backed by foreign governments are targeting companies involved in the shipping and storing the coronavirus vaccine at a low enough temperature to keep it from spoiling, IBM said in research released Thursday.

The announcement is the latest in a series of cybersecurity research reports that point to foreign governments employing hackers to break into the networks of groups working to rush out a vaccine, and comes as the U.S. prepares to ship refrigerated boxes of vaccines across the country this month.

While not every potential vaccine requires the same refrigeration, the one developed by Pfizer-BioNTech, which was approved Wednesday in the U.K. and may soon become the first coronavirus vaccine approved for distribution in the U.S., has to be shipped in special boxes of dry ice that must be opened quickly before use. The White House has claimed that as many as 20 million doses of the vaccine could

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Beware! Criminal Networks Likely to Sell Fake Coronavirus Vaccines on Internet, Interpol Issues Global Alert



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© Manmath Nayak | India.com News Desk


Coronavirus Vaccine Latest Update: At a time when a number of companies are busy developing coronavirus vaccine for the deadly virus, the Interpol on Thursday warned law enforcement agencies across the globe that organised criminal networks could try to advertise and sell fake COVID-19 vaccines physically and on the internet.

Issuing an orange alert to all 194 member countries, the Lyon-based international police cooperation body warned agencies to prepare for potential criminal activity in relation to “the falsification, theft and illegal advertising of COVID-19 and flu vaccines”.

“It also includes examples of crimes where individuals have been advertising, selling and administering fake vaccines,” a statement from the Interpol said.

Notably, the Interpol issues an Orange notice to warn of an event, a person, an object or a process representing a serious and imminent threat to public safety. However, the CBI, which is the

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5G’s rollout speeds along faster than expected, even with the coronavirus pandemic raging

The world may be grappling with a widespread pandemic, but that’s sure not slowing down 5G’s rollout. The super-fast technology reached more customers this year than expected and will cover about 60% of the global population by 2026, according to a new report from Ericsson. That makes 5G the fastest deployed mobile network ever, the Swedish networking giant said.



a laptop computer sitting on top of a keyboard: 5G has rolled out faster than any other mobile network in history. Angela Lang/CNET


© Provided by CNET
5G has rolled out faster than any other mobile network in history. Angela Lang/CNET

By the end of this year, there will be 218 million 5G subscriptions around the world, up from Ericsson’s forecast in June for 190 million — which itself was an increase from an earlier estimate. 

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“5G coverage will be built out to the extent that 1 billion people will live in 5G coverage areas by the end of 2020 worldwide,” Patrick Cerwall, head of strategic marketing insights at Ericsson, said in

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Your phone can send you an alert if you were near someone who has coronavirus

By Faith Karimi | CNN

As new coronavirus cases explode nationwide, health officials are turning to cell phones to help slow the spread of infections.

Thanks to technology available on Apple and Google phones, you can now get pop-up notifications in some states if you were close to someone who later tested positive for Covid-19. The alerts come via state health department apps that use Bluetooth technology to detect when you (or more precisely, your phone) has been in close contact with an infected person’s phone.

While these apps can’t keep you safe — they only let you know after you’ve been exposed — they could prevent others from getting infected if you take precautions, such as self-quarantining, after receiving an alert.

Millions of people are signing up, although these apps aren’t yet available in many states. Health officials believe the alerts could be especially helpful in cases where an

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Sorrento Therapeutics Plans to Cut Development of Its Coronavirus Vaccine if the Leaders’ Vaccines Work

Sorrento Therapeutics (NASDAQ:SRNE) is considerably behind Pfizer (NYSE:PFE), BioNTech (NASDAQ:BNTX)Moderna (NASDAQ:MRNA), and the rest of the leaders in the race to develop a coronavirus vaccine. While multiple vaccines have completed phase 3 clinical trials or will in the coming months, Sorrento’s lead vaccine, T-VIVA-19, hasn’t even entered clinical trials yet.

In this video from Motley Fool Live recorded on Nov. 12, Henry Ji, chairman, president, and CEO of Sorrento, talks about the potential advantages of the biotech’s vaccine. But given how far behind Sorrento is, he admits the company is watching the leaders and might stop development if it’s clear there won’t be room for latecomers.

Brian Orelli: You do have a vaccine that you’re working on called T-VIVA-19. How does that work, and then what are the advantages of that over the current late-stage vaccines that are being tested right now?

Henry Ji:

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Massachusetts grants inject $68M in economic development to towns hit hard by coronavirus

Cities and towns hit hardest by the coronavirus pandemic were the big winners of this year’s round of MassWorks economic development grant funding — totaling more than $68 million from Nantucket to Pittsfield.



Charlie Baker wearing a suit and tie: 19CoronaMain Boston, MA 11/18/20  With Secretary of Health and Human Services Marylou Sudders (cq) and Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Commissioner Jeffrey Riley (cq), Governor Charlie Baker (cq) gives a coronavirus update during the continuing pandemic. They speak in Gardner Auditorium in the Massachusetts State House. POOL PHOTO


© Provided by Boston Herald
19CoronaMain Boston, MA 11/18/20 With Secretary of Health and Human Services Marylou Sudders (cq) and Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Commissioner Jeffrey Riley (cq), Governor Charlie Baker (cq) gives a coronavirus update during the continuing pandemic. They speak in Gardner Auditorium in the Massachusetts State House. POOL PHOTO

“This year we’ve prioritized projects in the advanced stage of planning and design and permitting in communities hardest-hit by COVID-19 to help stimulate their recovery from the pandemic,” said Gov. Charlie Baker during a virtual ceremony on Zoom on Thursday morning.

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The state awarded funding for 36 projects in 35 cities and towns, and will help build 35,000 new housing units

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Why Airbnb is going public amid the coronavirus pandemic

  • Airbnb has filed to go public, even though the pandemic caused some major financial troubles at the company, leading it to take out two high-interest rate loans and lay off a quarter of the staff.
  • By going public now, the company can raise money to pay off the loans without having to pay an additional $1 billion in interest over five years.
  • Employees will also be able to sell off some of their equity, raising employee morale during a tough year with unprecedented layoffs. 
  • The company also outperformed hotel-centric competitors like Bookings.com and Expedia, differentiating itself during a tough year for travel.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Airbnb finally filed for its much-anticipated IPO on Monday, the most concrete move it has taken towards going public in a tumultuous year for the home-sharing and hospitality giant.

Airbnb’s September 2019 announcement of its intention to go public was made

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Facebook content moderators demand better coronavirus protections

More than 200 content moderators at Facebook have signed an open letter to Mark Zuckerberg demanding better COVID-19 protections. They say management has needlessly put their lives at risk by forcing them back into the office, even as full-time employees work from home until July 2021.





© Illustration by William Joel / The Verge


On October 12th, content moderators working for the third-party contracting firm Accenture in Austin, Texas were asked to return to the office. The company implemented additional cleaning measures and asked employees to wear masks. Despite these efforts, a contractor tested positive for COVID-19 shortly after returning to work, according to The Intercept.

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Facebook has been under intense pressure to stop the spread of viral misinformation and take down incitements to violence, particularly around the 2020 US election. During the pandemic, it relied more heavily on artificial intelligence to detect content that violated its

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Coronavirus hit on roaming charges hurts Vodafone

Nick Read, group CEO, touted “increased confidence” in the company’s full year outlook. Photo: Getty Images
Nick Read, group CEO, touted “increased confidence” in the company’s full year outlook. Photo: Getty Images

Vodafone Group’s (VOD) revenue for the first half of its 2021 financial year was down 2.3% year-on-year to €21.4bn ($25.4bn, £19.2bn) as the coronavirus pandemic impacted the money it makes from roaming as well as handset sales.

But the company’s share price ticked up roughly 4% Monday morning, helping to boost the FTSE 0.6%, as Nick Read, group CEO, touted “increased confidence” in the company’s full year outlook.

Vodafone's stock price over six months. Chart: Yahoo Finance UK
Vodafone’s stock price over six months. Chart: Yahoo Finance UK

The mobile operator said a “good underlying momentum” and the benefit from the acquisition of Liberty Global’s assets in Germany and Central and Eastern Europe was offset by lower revenue from roaming, handset sales, foreign exchange headwinds and the disposal of Vodafone New Zealand.

Read explained that “COVID-19 and the reduction in roaming revenues, through the

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