Amazon Web Services Bolsters Bet on Local Cloud, Homegrown Chips

(Bloomberg) — Amazon.com Inc.’s cloud computing division is adding products that help customers maintain local control of their data, a bet that could help it fend off rivals Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google.



a stack of flyers on a table: The logo for Amazon Web Services on a smartphone.


© Bloomberg
The logo for Amazon Web Services on a smartphone.

Amazon Web Services has a wide lead in selling on-demand software services, a business built on the economies of scale provided by vast server farms in data centers. Last year, the company went small, for the first time selling services for customers’ own data centers. The move acknowledged demand from customers requiring faster processing and the need to meet regulatory requirements by storing information inside their own walls.

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AWS bolstered that bet on Tuesday, kicking off its annual customer conference with two new variants of Outposts, the server rack product it started selling a year ago. While prior versions required customers to buy

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Intel and Nvidia Chips Power a Chinese Surveillance System

URUMQI, China — At the end of a desolate road rimmed by prisons, deep within a complex bristling with cameras, American technology is powering one of the most invasive parts of China’s surveillance state.

The computers inside the complex, known as the Urumqi Cloud Computing Center, are among the world’s most powerful. They can watch more surveillance footage in a day than one person could in a year. They look for faces and patterns of human behavior. They track cars. They monitor phones.

The Chinese government uses these computers to watch untold numbers of people in Xinjiang, a western region of China where Beijing has unleashed a campaign of surveillance and suppression in the name of combating terrorism.

Chips made by Intel and Nvidia, the American semiconductor companies, have powered the complex since it opened in 2016. By 2019, at a time when reports said that Beijing was using advanced

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Ambarella launches computer vision chips for edge AI

Chip designer Ambarella has announced a new computer vision chip for processing artificial intelligence at the edge of computer networks, like in smart cars and security cameras.

The new CV28M camera system on chip (SoC) is the latest in the company’s CVflow family. It combines advanced image processing, high-resolution video encoding, and computer vision processing in a single, low-power chip.

Ambarella packed a lot of AI processing power into the chip to anticipate the way computer networks will evolve as everything gets connected to the internet. Since networks could become inundated with data traffic, self-driving cars, for example, will have to do their processing at the edge of the network, or in the car itself, rather than interacting heavily with datacenter processors.

This means the sensors and image processors in edge devices will have to be very powerful, Ambarella VP Chris Day said in an interview with VentureBeat. “We’re working

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Trump Administration Lets Qualcomm Sell Huawei 4G Mobile Chips

Huawei is apparently not so bad after all, according to the Trump administration. It just gave Qualcomm permission to sell it chips.

Huawei is apparently not so bad after all, according to the Trump administration. It just gave Qualcomm permission to sell it chips.
Photo: Justin Sullivan (Getty Images)

The Trump administration, distracted by other important things, has apparently forgotten that it’s mad at Huawei. If this seems strange to you, it’s probably because we’ve all gotten used to hearing the government go on and on about how the Chinese telecommunications company is a threat to U.S. national security. But alas, these comments apparently do not matter much anymore, because the U.S. government is letting American companies sell certain items to Huawei again.

According to Reuters report, Qualcomm received a license from the U.S. Department of Commerce to sell 4G mobile phone chips to Huawei on Friday. In August, the Trump administration delivered what some called a “lethal blow” to Huawei by banning any company, not just

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Qualcomm gets OK to sell 4G chips to Huawei, despite US ban, report says

Huawei logo

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Qualcomm has reportedly been granted a license by the US government to sell 4G mobile chips to Huawei, despite a ban on American companies selling technology and parts to the China-based telecommunications company.

“We received a license for a number of products, which includes some 4G products,” a Qualcomm spokeswoman told Reuters, according to a Saturday report by the news agency. She didn’t specify which products Qualcomm can sell, saying only that they have to do with mobile devices. She also said Qualcomm has other license applications pending.

In August, citing national security and foreign policy concerns, the US Commerce Department expanded restrictions meant to limit Huawei’s access to chips made using American software and equipment. The department said it wouldn’t extend a temporary general license that allowed some transactions involving the

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US gives Qualcomm approval to sell 4G chips to Huawei despite sanctions

Qualcomm has received permission from the US to sell 4G mobile chips to Huawei, an exemption to the Trump administration’s ban on doing business with the Chinese company, Reuters reported. Qualcomm didn’t specify which products it’s allowed to sell to Huawei, but told Reuters they were related to mobile devices.



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© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


In May 2019, the White House issued an executive order barring US companies from doing business with Chinese companies like Huawei due to national security concerns. In May of this year, the Commerce Department tightened the restrictions to require any overseas semiconductor manufacturers to get a license from the US if they used US equipment or technology to make chips for Huawei. And effective in September, the US began requiring foreign semiconductor manufacturers to get a license to sell chips —even if not designed for Huawei specs— that are intended for the

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Qualcomm receives U.S. permission to sell 4G chips to Huawei in exception to ban

FILE PHOTO: A Qualcomm sign is seen at the third China International Import Expo (CIIE) in Shanghai, China November 5, 2020. REUTERS/Aly Song

(Reuters) – Qualcomm Inc QCOM.O on Friday received a license from the U.S. government to sell 4G mobile phone chips to China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, an exemption to U.S. trade restrictions imposed amid rising tensions with China.

“We received a license for a number of products, which includes some 4G products,” a Qualcomm spokeswoman told Reuters.

Qualcomm and all other American semiconductor companies were forced to stop selling to the Chinese technology firm in September after U.S. trade restrictions took effect.

The spokeswoman declined to comment on the specific 4G products Qualcomm can sell to Huawei but said they were related to mobile devices. Qualcomm has other license applications pending with the U.S. government, she said.

In the past Huawei was a relatively small chip customer

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Pfizer Vaccine, Disney Streaming, and Apple Chips on Cheddar

From Wall Street to Silicon Valley, these are the top stories that moved markets and had investors, business leaders, and entrepreneurs talking this week on Cheddar.

PFIZER’S VAX STUNNER

U.S. markets notched another winning week, propelled higher on Monday’s stunning news that Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine trial is showing at least 90 percent efficacy in preventing infection. Pfizer, together with its partners at the German biotech firm BioNTech, are continuing Phase 3 trials, hoping for regulatory approval in the coming weeks. If that happens, it would be the biggest medical breakthrough in a century — a vaccine made from scratch in under a year — ready to be rolled out to millions of people via a complicated dance of shipping logistics, public-private cooperation, and, importantly, patience. Moderna, which is also at work on a vaccine using the same type of mRNA technology as Pfizer, is expected to release interim results from
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Apple is making its own computer chips

Apple’s goal has always been to set itself apart. Remember the company’s “Get a Mac” campaign?

Even though Macs technically are PCs, or personal computers, Apple differentiated itself back then by running its own operating system. When the iPhone came along, the company’s go-it-alone approach extended even further. The iPhone didn’t just run on Apple’s software, its processor was designed by Apple in house. Now the company can say the same about its laptop and desktop computers. Apple announced Tuesday it was breaking ties with chipmaker Intel, and then unveiled the first Macs to feature the M1 chip, designed by Apple. The move is not just about computing power, it’s about industry power.

Add Apple’s own chip to all of its other one-of-a-kind features, “and that kinda starts to get into more of almost the secret sauce that Apple has,” said Neil Cybart, an analyst with Above Avalon, a research

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