Zoom CEO Eric Yuan on the challenges of adapting an enterprise product for consumers

There’s been a lot of talk about the consumerization of IT in the workplace. But in the case of Zoom, the pandemic forced the high-flying video conferencing service to rapidly shift gears in the other direction, resulting in some painful lessons along the way.

Zoom founder and CEO Eric Yuan said despite the company’s culture of always trying to see the world through its customers’ eyes, it had to rethink many of its assumptions when suddenly a wide range of consumers began using Zoom for everything from distance learning to having virtual cocktails with friends.

“On the one hand, we were very excited, because after many years of hard work your dream is coming true of helping people stay connected,” Yuan said. “But then suddenly, you have 30 times more growth than you were expecting, so how do you handle that? You’ve got to work harder.”

Yuan spoke on day

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Is Ripple Leaving US? CEO Backpedals On Threats After Biden Win

KEY POINTS

  • Ripple CEO Brad Garlinghouse said the company will wait and see before making a decision to leave
  • Earlier, the company threatened to leave the U.S. due to a lack of clarity about XRP tokens
  • Ripple used to position itself as one of the most regulatory compliant in the industry

After threatening to leave the U.S. amid concerns of regulatory uncertainty around XRP crypto tokens, Ripple has now decided to adopt a “wait and see” approach, especially after the election of Joe Biden as president.

Speaking to CNN, Brad Garlinghouse, CEO of Ripple, said the company has not put a strict timeline on when the company will make a decision to relocate. “I think I am waiting to see what dynamics change, associated with the Biden administration beginning their term in office, and I am optimistic that will actually improve where things sit for the XRP community broadly,” 

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Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield’s life and career rise, in photos

  • Stewart Butterfield founded Slack in 2013 after selling his first startup, Flickr, to Yahoo for more than $20 million.
  • Slack became one of the fastest-growing companies ever, achieving a $1 billion valuation less than a year after it officially launched.
  • Butterfield, whose birth name was Dharma before he changed it at age 12, was born in British Columbia and majored in philosophy in college. 
  • He’s currently engaged to a fellow tech founder: Jennifer Rubio, the cofounder of luggage startup Away.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Stewart Butterfield is on a roll.

In the early 2000s, Butterfield created Flickr, which sold to Yahoo for over $20 million. Now, his latest venture, Slack, one of the fastest-growing business apps ever, has been acquired by Salesforce for $27.7 billion.

The workplace messaging app, born out of a now-defunct gaming startup Tiny Speck, will help Salesforce compete with its chief rival, Microsoft,

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Amazon Web Services org chart under CEO Andy Jassy

  • Amazon Web Services has seen its growth slow down in recent years amid intensifying competition, the COVID-19 pandemic, and simple law of large numbers.
  • Business Insider identified and mapped out 95 of the most powerful people under AWS CEO Andy Jassy, who are leading key growth areas at the company.
  • They include influential execs such as Chief Technology Officer Werner Vogels, and Twitch CEO Emmett Shear, as well as some less familiar names, like Kathrin Buvac, the new vice president of business development, and Matt Garman, the head of sales and marketing.
  • Do you work at Amazon? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging apps Signal/Telegram (+1-415-926 -2066) or email ([email protected]).
  • Are you an Amazon Web Services employee? Contact reporter Ashley Stewart via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email ([email protected]).
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

For the better part of the past decade, Amazon Web Services was the

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Walmart CEO Doug McMillon says focus is on Walmart+ experience as it scales

Doug McMillon, CEO of Walmart.

Adam Jeffery | CNBC

Walmart CEO Doug McMillon said the discounter wants to grow its new membership program, Walmart+, but won’t sacrifice customer experience for subscriber numbers.

“One of the worst things we could do would be to sell a bunch of Walmart+ memberships and then have them be dissatisfied because they can’t get fast delivery times or spots,” he said Wednesday at the Morgan Stanley Virtual Global Consumer & Retail Conference.

Walmart has declined to share the number of subscribers since the program’s debut.

McMillon said the big-box retailer wants to gradually add perks and expand capacity to keep up with members’ orders, such as picking and packing groceries for their unlimited home deliveries. He said it will measure its success by a different number: Its Net Promoter Score, an index that indicates customers’ likelihood to recommend a product or a company.

“I realize

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Clearbanc CEO on how moving to Canada fast-tracked his tech career

  • Andrew D’Souza is a successful startup founder running a company out of Toronto.
  • He says leaving Silicon Valley to work at a Canadian company accelerated his career because he was able to establish himself at a fast-growing company in an emerging tech ecosystem.
  • “Everyone talks about, ‘Do you want to be a big fish in a small pond or a small fish in a big pond?’ But I think the dimension that people don’t think about is how fast is the pond growing,” D’Souza said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Canada’s tech ecosystem has been called many things. Silicon Valley North. Maple Valley. Even “the nice person’s Silicon Valley.” Call it what you want, but don’t count it out, says Andrew D’Souza, who runs one of Canadian’s hottest tech startups, Clearbanc.

He says that going home to Toronto after a stint in the San Francisco Bay Area turbocharged

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AWS CEO Andy Jassy explains huge bets in hybrid cloud

  • Amazon Web Services CEO Andy Jassy used his keynote at the AWS re:Invent conference on Tuesday to announce the introduction of several new products and services for the hybrid cloud market.
  • Hybrid cloud is a model that connects public cloud platforms like AWS with a customer’s own servers and data centers. 
  • Notably, Amazon Web Services spent years ignoring — and sometimes trashing — hybrid cloud computing, even as rivals like Microsoft, IBM, and Google have invested heavily in the technology. Jassy now slams those efforts as having “never lived up to the hype.”
  • At re:Invent this year, AWS announced smaller sizes of its Outposts devices, which allows customers to host the company’s cloud services from their own data centers.
  • It also announced that it would allow customers to host from their own servers Amazon Elastic Container Service and Elastic Kubernetes Service, developer tools that help manage cloud infrastructure.
  • Visit Business
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Kubernetes will deliver the app store experience for enterprise software, says Weaveworks CEO

Commentary: Google Cloud, Red Hat, and now AWS are serving up Kubernetes in a way that will make it dramatically easier to deploy and consume enterprise software, says the CEO of Weaveworks.

kubernetes-emblem-white-helm-on-blue-background-in-sketch-style-vector-id1189299051.jpg

Image: Oleg Mishutin, Getty Images/iStpckPhoto

As consumers, we’re used to getting and installing apps via Apple’s App Store or Google Play. As enterprise buyers, we undergo Dante’s nine circles of hell just to get garbage cobbled together by an overpriced systems integrator. Or we used to, until Kubernetes came along.

Talking to Alexis Richardson, CEO of Weaveworks, which popularized GitOps, a new way to operate and manage Kubernetes in production. The reason enterprises have missed the “app store moment” is because “everybody’s infrastructure has been different for so long.” He went on, “Containers are the way to solve that problem because they provide the next level of abstraction to encapsulate applications.” Containers come close to this app store

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Ex-Google CEO Eric Schmidt Talks Talks Tech, Young Leaders

(Miss this week’s The Leadership Brief? This interview below was delivered to the inbox of Leadership Brief subscribers on Sunday morning, Nov. 29. To receive weekly emails of conversations with the world’s top CEOs and business decisionmakers, click here.)

Eric Schmidt wants to see new leaders running the world, fast. “The sooner we can get the next generation in charge, given all the errors we have made, the better,” says Schmidt, the former CEO of Google. “They are generally smarter, more optimistic, they have more energy. There’s a lot of reasons to turn this thing over to them.”

But just not any kids. Schmidt is a firm believer in the power of exceptionalism. On Nov. 16 Schmidt Futures, the organization that he founded in 2017 with his wife Wendy to empower “talent who want to work on the hardest problems,” unveiled Rise, a new partnership with the Rhodes Trust to

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Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh’s Legacy, From Tech Leaders Who Knew Him Well

Tony Hsieh, bestselling author and longtime former CEO of ecommerce pioneer Zappos.com, died at age 46 on Friday. His tragic loss — and unusual impact on the tech and startup landscapes for the better part of three decades — set off an outpouring of condolences and messages of gratitude from leading politicians, entrepreneurs and investors.

Through his book “Delivering Happiness,” various business ventures and influence at conferences and in his hometown of Las Vegas, Hsieh touched many lives. Here, Forbes spoke with several tech leaders who knew him well — Sequoia partner Alfred Lin, Neo CEO Ali Partovi, Long Journey Ventures partner Cyan Banister and Lowercase Capital founder Chris Sacca — to hear

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