Google spied on employees and fired them for unionizing, U.S. labor board says

The U.S. National Labor Relations Board has filed a complaint against Google and its parent company Alphabet, accusing the tech juggernaut of violating labor laws.

The company was allegedly “interfering with, restraining, and coercing employees in the exercise of their rights guaranteed in Section 7 of the Act,” according to the complaint filed Tuesday.

Specifically, the NLRB case documents accuse Google of illegally spying on employees, firing several employees in retaliation for attempting to unionize, and illegally blocking employees from sharing work grievances and information with each other using general tools like calendars, email, meeting rooms, and an internal communication tool at Google called MemeGen.

The NLRB said it expects an answer from Google by Dec. 16 and the agency said it will hold a hearing on April 12, 2021, in San Francisco.

Google didn’t immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment.

The NLRB’s conclusion comes a year after CNBC

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The US labor board accused Google of illegally spying on employee activists, firing them, and blocking workers from organizing



a person holding a sign: Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider


© Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider
Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider

  • The National Labor Relations Board on Wednesday filed a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor laws during a crackdown of worker activism last year.
  • The complaint said Google unlawfully terminated two employees involved in worker activism.
  • It also accused Google of violating US labor laws by monitoring and interrogating workers involved in the protests.
  • Five employees were fired late last year for their involvement in protests at the company. Two of those employees are mentioned in the complaint.
  • Are you a current or former Google insider? You can contact this reporter securely using the encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-628-228-1836) or encrypted email ([email protected]). Reach out using a nonwork device.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The National Labor Relations Board (NRLB) on Wednesday issued a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor laws during a crackdown on worker activism last year.

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US Labor Board Challenges Google Moves Against Activist Employees

Google has been given two weeks to respond to a US labor board complaint accusing the internet giant of using surveillance, interrogation and other tactics to spy on activist employees.

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) complaint filed late Wednesday stemmed from the dismissal a year ago of a quartet of employees dubbed the “Thanksgiving Four.”

The workers sought a federal investigation into their dismissal, alleging they were sacked in retaliation for their labor organizing efforts, while Google maintained that the employees had violated data security policies.

A copy of the NLRB complaint seen by AFP contended that Google “surveilled” employees by peeking at slides being preparing in support of unionizing workers.

Google also “interrogated employees about protected activities” and threatened reprisals for venturing outside official company channels for handling complaints on such matters as workplace conduct, according to the complaint.

In addition, Google selectively applied rules to workers who

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U.S. Labor Board accuses Google of spying on employees, discouraging worker organization, and retaliation

  • The U.S. National Labor Relations Board filed a complaint against Google, alleging the company illegally terminated and surveilled employees.
  • The agency also accuses the company of illegally blocking employees from sharing work grievances and information with each other using general tools like calendars, email and meeting rooms, and an internal communication tool at Google called MemeGen.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Google employees at the tech giant's headquarters in Mountain View, California, walk off the job to protest the company's handling of sexual misconduct claims.


© Provided by CNBC
Google employees at the tech giant’s headquarters in Mountain View, California, walk off the job to protest the company’s handling of sexual misconduct claims.

The U.S. National Labor Relations Board has filed a complaint against Google and its parent company Alphabet, accusing the tech juggernaut of violating labor laws.

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The company was allegedly “interfering with, restraining, and coercing employees in the exercise of their rights guaranteed in Section 7 of the Act,” according to the complaint filed Tuesday.

Specifically, the NLRB case documents accuse Google of illegally spying

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Two former Google employees say the US labor board will charge the company with unlawfully spying on, then firing, workers involved in protests



a person holding a sign: Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider


© Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider
Tyler Sonnemaker/Business Insider

  • The National Labor Relations Board will file a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor laws during a crackdown of worker activism last year, according to two of the employees who were terminated.
  • The complaint will state that Google unlawfully terminated two employees involved in worker activism.
  • It will also state that Google violated US labor laws by monitoring and interrogating workers involved in the protests.
  • Five employees were fired late last year for their involvement in protests at the company. Two of those employees are mentioned in the complaint.
  • Are you a current or former Google insider? You can contact this reporter securely using the encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-628-228-1836) or encrypted email ([email protected]). Reach out using a nonwork device.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The National Labor Relations Board will issue a complaint accusing Google of violating several labor

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Facebook’s Oversight Board takes its first six cases

Facebook’s Oversight Board, an independent body that reviews Facebook moderation decisions, has accepted its first cases. The six appeals involve content removed under Facebook’s hate speech rules, nudity ban, and misinformation policies. They’re now open for seven days of public comment, after which the board will determine whether the posts should have been removed.

Most of the cases involve users outside the US posting non-English content — a known weak point for Facebook moderation — and at least two hinge on the nuance of someone publishing hate content to implicitly criticize it. One user posted screenshots of offensive tweets from former Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, for instance, allegedly to raise awareness of “horrible words.” Another post involved a user who shared an alleged Joseph Goebbels quote, but who appealed by saying they were comparing Goebbels’s words to a “fascist model” in US politics.

Each case will be referred to

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From hate speech to nudity, Facebook’s oversight board picks its first cases

By Elizabeth Culliford



graphical user interface: FILE PHOTO: Facebook logos


© Reuters/JOHANNA GERON
FILE PHOTO: Facebook logos

(Reuters) – Facebook Inc’s independent Oversight Board announced on Tuesday the first six cases where it could overrule the social media company’s decisions to remove certain pieces of content from its platforms.

The board, which Facebook created in response to criticism of its handling of problematic content, said it had received 20,000 cases since it opened its doors in October.

Three of the six cases involved content that Facebook removed for breaking hate speech rules.

An Oversight Board spokesman said hate speech cases had been “the most significant proportion” of appeals received.

“Hate speech is an especially difficult area,” Jamal Greene, one of the board’s co-chairs and a professor at Columbia Law School, told Reuters in an interview. “It’s not that easy … for an algorithm to get the context of” such speech.

Gallery: A timeline of voting rights in

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EHRC board member under scrutiny over social media use

A board member of the government’s equality watchdog has ‘liked’ or retweeted social media posts criticising Black Lives Matters protesters and describing the words misogynist and homophobe as “highly ideological propaganda terms” in the latest controversy to beset the EHRC, the Guardian can reveal.



a group of people standing in front of a flag: Photograph: Matthew Chattle/Rex/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Matthew Chattle/Rex/Shutterstock

Alasdair Henderson, who led the Equality and Human Rights Commission inquiry into Labour party antisemitism this year, also liked a tweet decrying “offence-taking zealots” who accused Roger Scruton of antisemitism, Islamophobia and homophobia, and one by Douglas Murray, who once called for Muslim immigration to Europe to be banned.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Alasdair Henderson has been a commissioner on the EHRC since 2018 and led its inquiry into Labour party antisemitism this year.


© Photograph: Matthew Chattle/Rex/Shutterstock
Alasdair Henderson has been a commissioner on the EHRC since 2018 and led its inquiry into Labour party antisemitism this year.

The EHRC report he led, published last month, stated: “The Labour party failed to investigate antisemitism complaints based on likes, retweets and shares on

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Single Board Computer Market | 4 Major Trends Fostering Industry Outlook Through 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Nov 26, 2020 (Market Insight Reports) —
Delaware, U.S. – According to the latest research study by GMI, the single board computer market is expected to record 12% CAGR during the forecast period 2020-2025.

A single circuit board computer (SBC) comprises all major components of a complete computer such as input/output, memory, microprocessor, and other features built on a single circuit board. On the other hand, desktop computers are an assembly of all-important components like memory, storage, input/output devices, and processor, connected through a common motherboard.

The benefits such as lightweight, compact size, and power efficiency as compared with multi-board computers will drive the single board computer market. The integrated feature of these computers which result in the low cost of production will escalate the demand across various industries.

Request for a sample copy of this report

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Global Single Board Computer Market (2020 to 2026) – COVID-19 Impact Analysis

DUBLIN, Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The “Single Board Computer Market – By Service, By Application: Global Industry Perspective, Comprehensive Analysis and Forecast 2020 – 2026” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

According to the report, global single board computer market was valued at approximately USD 632.10 Million in 2019, and is expected to generate revenue of around USD 1,010.78 Million by end of 2026, growing at a CAGR of around 12.1% between 2020 and 2026.

Building all the components such as memory, storage, and the microprocessor within a single circuit board is known as single board computer. The functionality of the single board computer is similar to that of the normal computer. Research and development activities are constantly underway in order to make the single board computers more compact and cost-effective. Owing to its low cost the single board computer are being widely used as educational tools;

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