Gasoline Car Bans Show Why Market Forces Aren’t Always Enough

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It’s been a strange year, so you’d be forgiven for missing an odd thing that happened in the U.K. last month. When Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leader of the Conservative Party, banned sales of new internal combustion engine cars from 2030, the decision was supported by the likes of oil giant Royal Dutch Shell Plc and the Confederation of British Industry, a powerful business group. 

How did these champions of market-driven policies and fewer regulations become promoters of such a heavy-handed intervention?

Perhaps the ban is simply something any competent government, regardless of its political bent, should be doing. The U.K. has a legally mandated goal to reach net-zero emissions by 2050. That means quickly cutting emissions from all sectors, including transport. Last year, the government’s independent advisor, the Climate Change Committee, recommended the 2030 ban as a way of meeting the U.K.’s climate targets. Maybe

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UK bans installation of new Huawei 5G equipment from September

The UK government is banning the installation of new Huawei 5G equipment from September 2021 as part of its plans to phase out the Chinese firm’s technology by 2027, The Financial Times reports. The decision follows the government’s announcement in July that firms would be barred from buying new equipment from January 2021 over national security concerns.

The announcement means that any telecoms companies who have stockpiled Huawei equipment ahead of the January cutoff will now not be able to use this for long-term 5G rollouts. The Financial Times reports that some companies have been stockpiling this equipment since summer. Firms will still be allowed to maintain old equipment after September, according to BBC News.

New legislation set to be debated in Parliament this week will start the process of enshrining the ban in law and set out how it will be

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YouTube Bans Trump-Friendly OANN For One Week After Network Touted Fake Covid Cure

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YouTube blocked One America News Network (OANN) from posting new videos or earning money on its platform for one week after the conservative network promoted misleading information about the Covid-19 pandemic, Axios first reported, a move that comes as the network gains new attention amid President Trump’s feud with Fox News.

Key Facts

It’s the first time YouTube has restricted the Trump-friendly network, according to Axios, though OANN has also violated YouTube’s Covid-19 misinformation policy before. 

The ban will block OANN from posting new videos on YouTube’s site and bar the network from earning money through YouTube’s “Partner Program.”

A YouTube spokesperson, Ivy Choi, told CNN the platform removed the video and restricted the network from its site

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Los Angeles Police Department Bans Use Of Facial Recognition Software

Illustration for article titled The LAPD Just Banned Its Officers From Using Third-Party Facial Recognition Software

Photo: David McNew / Staff (Getty Images)

The Los Angeles Police Department issued a moratorium on the use of commercial facial recognition software on Tuesday, effectively ending a trial with dystopian software manufacturer Clearview AI that the department had long sought to downplay.

The decision reportedly comes after Buzzfeed News probed the LAPD’s use of the software, which officials had in the past claimed to only deploy “sparingly.” Contrary to those claims, however, the investigation found that more than 25 LAPD employees had performed nearly 475 searches over a three month period in 2019, using the facial recognition software as a tool to scrape non-criminal images from their vast databases. Typically, those databases are compiled by culling photos from social media and other public internet platforms, which has drawn the ire of civil liberties activists who claim that the data is gathered without the consent of the

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Tech groups’ services could face bans if they breach rules, EU industry chief says

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – Technology companies’ services could be banned from the European market if they do not heed EU regulation, Europe’s industry chief Thierry Breton told German weekly Welt am Sonntag, as the European Commission finalizes rules on internet companies.

Breton will announce new draft rules known as the Digital Services Act and the Digital Markets Act together with European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager on Dec. 2.

The rules will set out a list of do’s and don’ts for gatekeepers – online companies with market power – forcing them to share data with rivals and regulators and not to promote their services and products unfairly.

The new draft rules come as critics of U.S. tech giants, which include companies and industry bodies, question the EU’s rulings against Alphabet <GOOGL.O> unit Google, saying they have not curbed its allegedly anti-competitive behaviour. Some want EU enforcers to go further than just ordering

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Trump bans Americans from investing in Chinese firms he claims have ties to the military

President Donald Trump has signed an executive order banning Americans from investing in Chinese firms that the administration says are owned or controlled by the Chinese military.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump leads a meeting with the White House Coronavirus Task Force and pharmaceutical executives in Cabinet Room of the White House on March 2, 2020 in Washington, DC.


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump leads a meeting with the White House Coronavirus Task Force and pharmaceutical executives in Cabinet Room of the White House on March 2, 2020 in Washington, DC.

The order applies to 31 Chinese companies which it says “enable the development and modernization” of China’s military and “directly threaten” US security.

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Smartphone maker Huawei and Hikvision, one of the world’s largest manufacturers and suppliers of video surveillance equipment, are among the blacklisted companies. Some of the other companies listed, including China Telecom and China Mobile, trade on the New York Stock Exchange.

Trump’s order bans US investors from owning or trading any securities that originate or are exposed to those firms. This includes pension

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Trump bans U.S. investment in Chinese military companies

China “is increasingly exploiting United States capital to resource and to enable the development and modernization of its military, intelligence, and other security apparatuses, which continues to allow the PRC to directly threaten the United States homeland and United States forces overseas,” the Trump order said.

The impact of the ban is unclear. The affected companies do not appear to include China’s major publicly traded tech firms, and several of the companies said to be affected by the prohibition, including Huawei, don’t trade on stock markets. Others are large state-owned defense contractors, such as China Electronics Technology Group Corp., that don’t have foreign stockholders.

Some of the firms do have foreign investors, including China Mobile Communications Group, CRRC Corp. and China Telecommunications Corp.

The Pentagon didn’t respond to a request for comment, nor did China’s embassy in the United States.

In a post on his Senate website, Sen. Marco Rubio

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Trump Bans US Investments In 31 Companies Controlled By China’s Military

KEY POINTS

  • U.S. firms and investors are blocked from owning shares in several Chinese companies
  • The block aims to prevent the development of Chinese military and intelligence
  • The ban applies to 31 Chinese firms, including Huawei

President Donald Trump on Thursday signed an executive order that banned Americans from investing in a list of companies that the administration believes support the Chinese military. 

The order — which blocks American firms or individuals from investing or owning shares — applies to 31 Chinese companies. It will take effect on Jan. 11, 2021.

Chinese companies such as Huawei, Hikvision, Inspur Group, Panda Electronics Group, China Telecommunications Corp. and China National Nuclear Corp. were blacklisted, the initial list released by the Department of Defense in June noted. 

The Trump administration said the executive order is designed to prevent U.S. companies or individuals from enabling “the development and modernization” of the Chinese military, CNBC

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Trump bans US investments in Chinese firms connected to China’s military

President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning Americans from investing in Chinese firms that the administration says are owned or controlled by the Chinese military.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: U.S. President Donald Trump leads a meeting with the White House Coronavirus Task Force and pharmaceutical executives in Cabinet Room of the White House on March 2, 2020 in Washington, DC.


© Drew Angerer/Getty Images
U.S. President Donald Trump leads a meeting with the White House Coronavirus Task Force and pharmaceutical executives in Cabinet Room of the White House on March 2, 2020 in Washington, DC.

The order applies to 31 Chinese companies that it says “enable the development and modernization” of China’s military and “directly threaten” US security.

Smartphone maker Huawei and Hikivision, one of the world’s largest manufacturers and suppliers of video surveillance equipment, are among the blacklisted companies. Some of the other companies listed, including China Telecom and China Mobile, trade on the New York Stock Exchange.

Video: Chinese government halts Ant Group’s giant IPO (CNN Money)

Chinese government halts Ant Group’s giant IPO

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Trump’s order also

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The Technology 202: Democrats warn Big Tech’s extended ad bans could hurt their chances in Georgia

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee’s executive director Scott Fairchild criticized the decisions, saying the bans “amount to unacceptable voter suppression.” 

Tech companies seeking to quash election disinformation are in a bind. 

On the one hand, ads can help candidates on both sides get information to potential voters. Fairchild warned in a statement that the move could actively harm efforts to inform voters about the runoffs. He called for an exemption for ads in Georgia over the next two months. 

But companies are also scrambling to extend what were meant to be temporary changes amid a chaotic and uncertain political environment in which President Trump is refusing to concede and makes baseless claims of election fraud. It’s unclear if the companies can sustain the pace of enforcement they have had in the last week, my colleague Elizabeth Dwoskin reports. 

Facebook and Google initially indicated the ad bans would last about a

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