Microsoft removes individuals from Productivity Score after backlash

  • Microsoft on Tuesday updated its Productivity Score tool, in response to criticism about a feature that tracked individuals using Microsoft Teams. 
  • Organizations will receive aggregated scores, with individual user activity hidden from view, the company said. 
  • Jared Spataro, corporate vice president for Microsoft 365, wrote in a blog post that no one in the company will now be able to use the tool to access individual user data. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Microsoft on Tuesday removed a feature that shared detailed information about how remote employees worked, responding to public backlash about the Productivity Score tool.

The feature was part of a suite of tools in Microsoft Teams that give employers insight into employee behaviour, but some said monitoring individual data was too invasive. 

“We appreciate the feedback we’ve heard over the last few days and are moving quickly to respond by removing user names entirely from

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Libra cryptocurrency linked to Facebook changes name to Diem amid backlash

Dec. 1 (UPI) — The Libra cryptocurrency project Facebook launched in 2019 changed its name Tuesday to get a fresh start.

The association for the cryptocurrency project headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, announced in a press release it was changing its name from Libra Association to Diem Association. The group will now be known as Diem Network, and the digital currency will be called the Diem Dollar, Bloomberg reported.

Diem, which means “day” in Latin, signals a “new day for the project,” the release said.

The name change is also about “reinforcing its organizational independence as it progresses toward regulatory approval for launch” of its first digital coin, according to the release.

“We like the connotation of it kind of being a new day for the project,” Diem Association CEO Stuart Levey told Bloomberg. “We wanted a new start.”

“The Diem project will provide a simple platform for fintech innovation to

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Microsoft Makes Changes To Productivity Score Tool After Privacy Backlash

Topline

 Microsoft on Tuesday said employers will no longer have access to data on individual employees through its Productivity Score tool, after privacy experts criticized the feature as invasive workplace monitoring software.  

Key Facts

Launched earlier this month, Productivity Score let companies with a Microsoft 365 business subscription see how individual employees were using Microsoft products, allowing bosses to see how many hours workers spent on Microsoft Teams or the number of times their camera was on in meetings in the last month, for example.

After widespread criticism, Microsoft 365 Corporate Vice President Jared Spataro said in a blog post the company will remove individual employee monitoring altogether, saying “no one in the organization will be able to use Productivity Score to access data about

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Comcast faces backlash over plan to charge customers up to $100 for going over a home-internet data limit rolling out to 14 new states



a sign on the side of a brick building: Comcast sign logo in the wall of a building at Universal Studios. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images


© Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images
Comcast sign logo in the wall of a building at Universal Studios. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

  • Comcast is planning on adding data caps to its home-internet plans, starting in January.
  • In 14 states and the District of Columbia, customers with Xfinity internet plans that aren’t unlimited will be constrained to 1.2 TB of data per month, or face overage charges. 
  • Comcast has had data caps in other parts of the country since 2016.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Comcast is adding a data cap for some of its home-internet plans starting in January. The telecommunications giant recently confirmed it’s introducing a limit of 1.2 TB on Xfinity Internet plans in 14 states and the District of Colombia.

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If customers that don’t have unlimited plans go over that cap, they must pay $10 for each additional 50 GB

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WHO drops censorship of words ‘Taiwan’ and ‘China’ on social media after backlash | World news

The World Health Organisation has removed social media filters which were censoring the words “Taiwan” and “China” from its Facebook page after an online backlash, but said the blocks were because of an “onslaught” of cyber attacks.

The about-face comes amid intense criticism over China’s continued blocking of Taiwan – which has gone more than 215 days without a local case of Covid-19 – from participation in meetings of the WHO’s decision-making body, the World Health Assembly.

This week internet users began reporting the WHO’s Facebook page would not allow comments that included the word Taiwan. The Guardian’s attempts to post comments found it was also blocking the word “China”. Posters began replacing characters in the word to get past the censors, including “ⓉⒶⒾⓌⒶⓃ ​ ⒸⒶⓃ ⒽⒺⓁⓅ”, or using the island’s former name, “Formosa”.

Taiwan’s foreign ministry said the block ran contrary to the neutrality the WHO should be upholding,

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WHO drops censorship of words ‘Taiwan’ and ‘China’ on social media after backlash | World Health Organization

The World Health Organisation has removed social media filters which were censoring the words “Taiwan” and “China” from its Facebook page after an online backlash, but said the blocks were because of an “onslaught” of cyber attacks.

The about-face comes amid intense criticism over China’s continued blocking of Taiwan – which has gone more than 215 days without a local case of Covid-19 – from participation in meetings of the WHO’s decision-making body, the World Health Assembly.

This week internet users began reporting the WHO’s Facebook page would not allow comments that included the word Taiwan. The Guardian’s attempts to post comments found it was also blocking the word “China”. Posters began replacing characters in the word to get past the censors, including “ⓉⒶⒾⓌⒶⓃ ​ ⒸⒶⓃ ⒽⒺⓁⓅ”, or using the island’s former name, “Formosa”.

Taiwan’s foreign ministry said the block ran contrary to the neutrality the WHO should be upholding,

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