Trump Administration Adds China’s Biggest Chip Maker To Trade Blacklist For Alleged Military Ties

Topline

The U.S. Department of Defense added China’s biggest chipmaker, SMIC and major oil firm CNOOC to a trade blacklist due to their alleged ties to the country’s military, continuing the outgoing Trump administration’s crackdown on Chinese firms.

Key Facts

Late on Thursday, the Department of Defense announced a total of four additions to its blacklist also including China Construction Technology Co Ltd and China International Engineering Consulting Corp.

SMIC, which is China’s biggest semiconductor maker, relies heavily on equipment and software from U.S. suppliers to design and manufacture its chips.

In a stock exchange filing on Friday the Chinese chipmaker said that it was aware of the action and was still evaluating the potential fallout.

Crucial Quote

In a Wall Street Journal

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Second Ontario government computer specialist fired in wake of alleged $11M COVID-19 fraud

A second senior information technology employee has been fired from the Ontario government after the alleged theft of $11 million in pandemic relief funds, the Star has learned.

Shalini Madan was terminated with cause from her $132,513-a-year job as manager of E-Ministries Support at the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services.

She had been suspended with pay since Aug. 11.

Her dismissal came after her husband, Sanjay Madan, was sacked from his $176,608-a-year post as director in the Ministry of Education’s iAccess Solutions Branch in early November.

In documents filed with the Ontario Superior Court, the province alleges that “some or all of” Shalini Madan, Sanjay Madan, their sons Chinmaya Madan and Ujjawal Madan, and associate Vidhan Singh perpetrated “a massive fraud” to siphon COVID-19 aid payments to hundreds of Bank of Montreal and TD accounts.

The government, whose accusations have not been proven in court, alleges “damages for fraud,

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Monterey County cop placed on leave after alleged lewd and disparaging social media posts against Black Lives Matter

PACIFIC GROVE — A Pacific Grove police officer has been placed on leave after he allegedly made a social media posting using offensive language about the Black Lives Matter movement. It’s the same officer who in May reportedly placed stickers on his private vehicle with anti-LGBTQ language as well as supporting a right-wing militia group.

At a Sunday press conference, PG Police Chief Cathy Madalone said she put an unidentified officer on administrative after it was discovered Saturday that lewd and disparaging remarks about the civil rights movement had been posted to his social media account.

“Yesterday it was brought to our attention that one of our officers posted ‘F-dot-dot-dot Black Lives Matter’ on social media,” Madalone said. “He has been placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation.”

She did not name the officer, citing a “personnel matter,” but did confirm that it is the same officer

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Argentina strip Pablo Matera of captaincy after alleged xenophobic social media posts | Argentina rugby union team

Argentina have stripped Pablo Matera of the captaincy and stood him down from Saturday’s final Tri Nations clash with the Wallabies as they investigate allegedly “discriminatory and xenophobic” social media posts.

Just weeks after becoming a national hero as he inspired the Pumas to their first win over the All Blacks, Matera is under fire for tweets he allegedly made between 2011 and 2013 relating to Bolivian and Paraguayan domestic staff and black people.

The Argentina Rugby Union issued a statement on Tuesday condemning the comments and announcing the sacking of Matera. It also said veteran lock Guido Petti and hooker Santiago Socino had been stood down before the weekend’s game in Sydney, but did not elaborate on why.

“The Argentine Rugby Union strongly repudiates the discriminatory and xenophobic comments published by members of the Los Pumas team on social media and meeting as an emergency, the board of directors

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Amazon wins legal fight against eBay over alleged seller poaching

Amazon secured a major legal victory in its fight with rival eBay over seller poaching, with an arbitration panel ruling in its favor earlier this month, according to court filings by the company on Tuesday.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., listens during a discussion at the Air Force Association's Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. Amazon is considering a plan to open as many as 3,000 new AmazonGo cashierless stores in the next few years, according to people familiar with matter, an aggressive and costly expansion that would threaten convenience chains. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., listens during a discussion at the Air Force Association’s Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. Amazon is considering a plan to open as many as 3,000 new AmazonGo cashierless stores in the next few years, according to people familiar with matter, an aggressive and costly expansion that would threaten convenience chains. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

eBay had filed two lawsuits — against Amazon in Santa Clara County in 2018 and against a group of Amazon managers in the US District Court for the Northern District of California in 2019 —

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Alleged source code of penetration testing software Cobalt Strike published on GitHub

Source code allegedly belonging to commercial penetration testing software Cobalt Strike has been published on GitHub, potentially providing a new path for hackers to attack companies.

Penetration testing, usually abbreviated as pen testing, has legitimate uses as a security tool to test security but can also be used by bad actors to attack a company. Ethical pen testing involves simulated attacks on a computer system to evaluate the security of the given system. In the hands of hackers, the same pen testing software can be used to identify security issues that can be exploited.

Cobalt Strike, which pitches itself as a legitimate pen testing solution, has been controversial for years thanks to its use by hacking groups, though they had to pay $3,500 per year for a license to use the software or use a pirated copy. Malpedia has a page dedicated to Cobalt Strike, noting that it allows an

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